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  • in reply to: Uniform Books – Best Ones #196493
    Avatar photoGeneral Slade
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    I’m very fond of the Blandford Colour Series books and I would go into bat for John Mollo and Malcolm McGregor’s Uniforms of the American Revolution and Philip Haythornthwaite and Michael Chappell’s Uniforms of the Penninsular War 1807-1814.  I also love Haythornthwaite and Chappell’s Uniforms of the Retreat from Moscow though the information on the Russian army may be a bit outdated.

     

    in reply to: Help identifying flags #195856
    Avatar photoGeneral Slade
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    I agree with Usagitsuki, they are Saxony (the figures appear to be ‘paint conversions’ of Minifigs French infantry): https://www.warflag.com/napflags/flaghtml/saxinf11.htm

    in reply to: Wurttemberg Infantry Flags #193870
    Avatar photoGeneral Slade
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    Indeed a complex offering and somewhat mitigates the ‘honour’ of carry flags, when you can swap indiscriminently between units the way they were. Venerable Keith Over only starts at 1811 anyway, so even just the last 4 years were a mess. At the time I managed to sell about 50 copies of his books to locals, as well as numerous flags in multiple scales to feed the napoleonic frenzy for information here. In contrast I note seeing someone mounting what appears to be an infantry size banner for Russian Dragoons- certainly a monstrosity… Congrats on finding some completion… -d

    I’m very fond of that Keith Over book. I have had it since I was a kid. For years it seemed to be the only information available on the flags and standards of the Napoleonic Wars.  It surprises me that no one has attempted an updated version.  But then I suppose it is a huge topic and probably not one that is going to attract a wide readership.

    With regard to finding some completion on the question of Wurttemberg colours, I am afraid I am not quite there yet. On closer reading, it turns out that some of the information included in David Wright’s book appears contradictory. For example, on page 35, which deals with the colours carried by Infantry Regiment No. 7 (which confusingly became Infantry Regiment No. 8 in 1814), there are two paragraphs about the flags the regiment carried.

    The first says:

    “The 1811 colours were not awarded until 1813. Each battalion carried one of the same colour. On the distribution of colours in 1814, the first battalion carried two of these colours and the 2nd two of the 1798 ones.”

    The second says:

    “On the distribution of colours in 1814, the 1st battalion carried two of the 1807 colours and the 2nd two of the 1798 ones formerly belonging to Infanterie-Regiment Nr. 2 Herzog Willhelm.”

    So colour me confused.

     

    in reply to: Wurttemberg Infantry Flags #193851
    Avatar photoGeneral Slade
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    Six-and-a-half years on from posting this query I think I have found an answer.  This Christmas Santa brought me Wurttemberg Infantry of the Napoleonic Wars by David Wright, published by Ken Trotman books.  It is a very well laid out, nicely illustrated softback book and in it the author gives details of the colours carried by each of the line and guard infantry regiments.  A brief summation of the information Wright gives would be that colours were produced in 1798, 1803, 1807 and 1811 (but the latter were not issued until 1813).  For most of the period each battalion of a regiment carried two identical standards.  The exception was in 1813 when the 1811 colours were awarded.  At this point each battalion carried one of the new colours.  In 1814 there was a redistribution of colours at which point each battalion returned to carrying two colours.  However, the colours carried by the first and second battalions of a regiment might now be different, with the first battalion carrying two of the 1811 colours and the second carrying two from an earlier award.

    It is all a bit confusing but David Wright sets it out a lot more clearly than I have succeeded in doing and if you are interested in the subject I think it is well worth investing in his book.

    https://kentrotman.co.uk/newbooks/wurttemberg-infantry-of-the-napoleonic-wars-military-colours-4/

     

    in reply to: Best Figures Collection in a Boardgame #193138
    Avatar photoGeneral Slade
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    That’s the thing with Lovecraft’s universe, humans never win.

    Cthulhu Wars from Petersen Games gets round this by having the players take the role of competing great old ones and making humans nothing more than pawns.  It’s a great game but you need to take out a mortgage to buy it and then take out another mortgage to buy somewhere to store the box.

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Petersen-Games-Cthulhu-Strategy-Board/dp/B00NT5AI8C

    in reply to: Best Figures Collection in a Boardgame #193087
    Avatar photoGeneral Slade
    Participant

    Cthulhu: Death May Die. It’s a bit of a one trick pony though, and expensive.

    That’s a fun game – so long as you don’t mind losing.  It could be that my gaming group is just rubbish at it but we never seem to win.  That doesn’t stop us from wanting to play again though.  Plus, as Mr Sage says, the miniatures are nice.

    On a similar kind of theme, the Zombicide 2nd edition miniatures are very good – however, as the name of the game suggests, the vast majority are zombies, so may not be of much use to you.  Still, it is a very enjoyable game and if you are buying it to play then you get the added bonus that the hero figures can be used for other games.

    https://www.zombicide.com/modern-zombicide-products/

    in reply to: Napoleonic Cavalry – what did they really do? #191086
    Avatar photoGeneral Slade
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    Hi Guy,

    I agree with everything in your last post.  I think the idea that dragoons are somehow different from other cavalry in the Napoleonic era is misguided.  How effective they are as battlefield cavalry really comes down to the size of the horses they are sitting on (and training obviously).  French dragoons were, according to the regulations, mounted on smaller horses than the cuirassiers and carabiniers, so it might be appropriate to make them somewhat less effective in a charge than the bigger boys.  But the notion that they should therefore sit and fire their muskets at the enemy is just silly.

    I personally don’t have any problem with denoting some cavalry (such as French dragoons and Bavarian dragoons) as ‘medium’ cavalry and making them a bit more effective than light dragoons and hussars and a bit less effective than heavy dragoons, cuirassiers etc.  However, using the term ‘medium’ cavalry on certain forums will annoy the experts who will tell you there was no such thing.  And then you will find yourself caught up in the kind of Napoleonic debate you have wisely spent years avoiding.

     

    in reply to: Napoleonic Cavalry – what did they really do? #191056
    Avatar photoGeneral Slade
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    I thought everyone knew that the role of cavalry is to give tone to what would otherwise be a mere vulgar brawl: https://magazine.punch.co.uk/image/I0000LEv5mpE01Cg All the best, John.

    I love that cartoon.  I am seriously tempted to buy a print.

    in reply to: Napoleonic Cavalry – what did they really do? #191051
    Avatar photoGeneral Slade
    Participant

    Hi Guy,

    I haven’t seen the online discussion you are referencing but I agree with the general tenor of your post.  However, it might be worth taking a look at Philip Haythornthwaite’s Osprey, Napoleonic Heavy Cavalry and Dragoon Tactics because it includes some interesting stuff that I wasn’t aware of before reading it.  For example, he quotes from Jonathan Leach’s Rough Sketches of the Life of an Old Soldier, where Leach says that the French dragoons in the Peninsula were armed with muskets that were able to out range the “pop-gun” carbines of the British heavy and light dragoons, so when bodies of cavalry met at a distance in broken terrain the French would dismount and shoot at the British cavalry while remaining out of range of their return fire.  He goes on to say: “In the French army, one man was left in charge of three or four horses, out of reach of fire, whilst the dismounted dragoons or chasseurs became efficient light infantry, and acted as such if their infantry were not up.” However, Haythornthwaite does not suggest that this practice was widespread in other theatres or in other armies.  He also doesn’t suggest it was a tactic used on the battlefield during a general engagement.

    Haythornthwaite also notes that even heavy cavalry engaged in skirmishing and quotes artillery officer Cavalié Mercer (Journal of the Waterloo Campaign) who wrote, ‘the cuirassiers led the second attack . . . sending up a cloud of skirmishers, who galled us terribly by a fire of carbines and pistols at scarcely 40 yards from our front.’

    In his companion book, Napoleonic Light Cavalry Tactics, Haythornthwaite says there were instances where cavalry engaged in volley-firing from the saddle when being engaged by the enemy and cites one example where this was successful (French 20e Chasseurs a Cheval against Russian cavalry at Eylau – where the snow reduced the Russian charge to a walking pace) and where it was disastrous (French chasseurs and dragoons at Sahagun where they were swept away by the British 15th Hussars).  In the same book, the author also notes that during the retreat from Quatre Bras, the British 10th Dragoons dismounted its skirmishers, who were armed with the Baker rifle, to block the bridge over the river Thy and so discourage the French pursuit.

    Having said all of this, the examples Haythornthwaite cites all seem to be exceptions to the rule and I am not sure that trying to incorporate them into a set of wargame rules would make any sense at anything above the skirmish level.

    Best wishes

    Stephen

     

     

    Avatar photoGeneral Slade
    Participant

    Splintered Light has some elven dogs that would look pretty close if you were to snip off the unicorn horn they have been given:

    http://www.splinteredlightminis.com/elvendogs.html

    in reply to: Should I strip? I would really rather not… #186915
    Avatar photoGeneral Slade
    Participant

    Don’t strip them.  Don’t repaint them.  Stripping and cleaning up 15mm figures is a miserable task.  Badly painted troops fight just as well as well painted ones.  And if the way they look really bothers you, don’t wear your glasses when you play.

    in reply to: Huge Britains Collection by Auction #185206
    Avatar photoGeneral Slade
    Participant

    I’m not really into toy soldiers either (at least not that kind of toy soldiers) but I did find it fascinating looking through what is being sold.  It is an incredible collection.  And this particular lot did introduce me to the existence of the Kerrison Predictor, something I had never heard of before:

    https://auctions.dunbarsloane.co.nz/1711/catalogue/0194

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kerrison_Predictor

    in reply to: Today’s rant #185142
    Avatar photoGeneral Slade
    Participant

    A hood and a neighbourhood?

    I’ll be leaving now.

    in reply to: Today’s rant #185123
    Avatar photoGeneral Slade
    Participant

    But two Hoods are better than one.

    I’ll get my coat.

    in reply to: Today’s rant #185115
    Avatar photoGeneral Slade
    Participant

    I don’t know whether it is of any interest to you Not Connard but Keep Wargaming has got a single Navwar 1/3000 HMS Hood for sale for £1.50 and their postage and packing is incredibly reasonable. Their stuff comes in a box and I think the charge is about £1.50.  I have bought loads of stuff off them over the years and their service is second to none.

    https://www.keepwargaming.co.uk/navwar-13000-ww2-warships-n1152a-hms-hood-post-1941-refit-x-1-7557-p.asp

    in reply to: Origins and Facts #183348
    Avatar photoGeneral Slade
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    Is French ‘light infantry blue’ actually a thing?

    Nope. 🙂

    I’m glad about that because I have long since repainted my light infantry in the ‘right’ colour.

    in reply to: Origins and Facts #183344
    Avatar photoGeneral Slade
    Participant

    Is French ‘light infantry blue’ actually a thing?  I thought the idea that they wore different colour uniforms to the line just came from the notorious Osprey, ‘Napoleon’s Light Infantry’, which persuaded a generation (me included) to paint their lights in mid-blue uniforms.

    in reply to: Most common British WWII tank? #183323
    Avatar photoGeneral Slade
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    If you have a Bren Carrier and the enemy has no armoured vehicles then MGIAT!

    I’m in total agreement with this. What does MGIAT mean?

    My God It’s A Tank 🙂

    Excellent.  If that’s what it means I am in more than total agreement.

    in reply to: Most common British WWII tank? #183290
    Avatar photoGeneral Slade
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    If you have a Bren Carrier and the enemy has no armoured vehicles then MGIAT!

    I’m in total agreement with this.

     

     

     

     

    What does MGIAT mean?

    in reply to: Most common British WWII tank? #183279
    Avatar photoGeneral Slade
    Participant

    Like Montgomery, I’m aware of the risks and I’m willing to accept one hundred per cent casualties.

    in reply to: Most common British WWII tank? #183277
    Avatar photoGeneral Slade
    Participant

    How about taking a look at that big sign in red reading: ‘Here be Dragons’ and avoid that 44 page dead end? But if you must – an armoured vehicle intended to take ground in the face of the enemy and engage and defeat enemy armour. Tracked – possibly but what about some French stuff? Turreted? – Swedish S Tanks? Irrelevant. We know a British tank when we see it. It has kit for tea making.

    So we’re agreed?  A Bren Gun Carrier is a tank, right?

    in reply to: Most common British WWII tank? #183275
    Avatar photoGeneral Slade
    Participant

    Maybe we should decide how we are going to define ‘tank’ and work backwards (or forwards) from there?

    in reply to: Most common British WWII tank? #183180
    Avatar photoGeneral Slade
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    For me, the Bren Gun Carrier (or Universal Carrier if you insist) is the iconic British vehicle of WWII.  It’s not exactly a tank but they have got them in the Tank Museum and if it’s good enough for them . . .

    in reply to: Allies-1805 And the Bizarre Myth about Dates! #182688
    Avatar photoGeneral Slade
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    Hi Buck,

    I don’t think the Kagan book is what you are looking for. I don’t have the book in front of me but from memory it deals with the diplomatic and strategic aspects of the conflict rather than the tactical.  I think it is well worth a read but I don’t think it will provide any inspiration for creating wargame scenarios at the divisional level.

    Then again, it has been a long time since I read it, so hopefully someone who has read it more recently can confirm or deny this.

    Best wishes

    Stephen

    in reply to: Strenghtening swords and bayonets #182413
    Avatar photoGeneral Slade
    Participant

    That makes sense.  I still think I would need to hire someone with a steadier hand, better eyesight and a lot more patience to succeed though.

    in reply to: Strenghtening swords and bayonets #182400
    Avatar photoGeneral Slade
    Participant

    Minifigs are particularly difficult to drill. I’ve never managed it successfully. However, on occasion I’ve ended up with the front of the hand removed by the drill. It is possible to file in a bit deeper so it will accommodate a spear/pike shaft. I added a micro dot of green stuff, more blue than yellow. Let it be for 1o minutes and then shaped it with a scalpel and indented for the fingers. It worked. I wouldn’t like to do it multiple times.

    Nor would I.  I think it is going to be one of those things that has to wait until I win the lottery and I can afford to pay some poor unfortunate to do it for me.

    The only problem is I don’t do the lottery.  But apart from that it’s a solid plan.

    in reply to: Strenghtening swords and bayonets #182398
    Avatar photoGeneral Slade
    Participant

    Thanks for the link Mike6t3.  It actually includes advice specific to Minifigs.  Unfortunately, I don’t understand the technique.  The author suggests removing the top half of a spear but not the bottom half, flattening the hand with pliers and then drilling through that.  I don’t understand how you would do that with the bottom half of the spear still attached.  Or am I missing something?

    in reply to: Strenghtening swords and bayonets #182394
    Avatar photoGeneral Slade
    Participant

    Is it the drilling hands or the piano wires that was unsuccessful?

    It was the drilling I couldn’t get the hang of.  I was trying to repair some old Minifigs but the hands are pretty small in the first place, plus the shaft of the pike is often attached to the body of the figure at some point so I ended up having to carve away at the figure as well as drill the hands.  So I started with a bent pike and ended up with a total mess.

    in reply to: Strenghtening swords and bayonets #182392
    Avatar photoGeneral Slade
    Participant

    Surely the amount of glue needed to make any appreciable difference would be such that the weapon looks like a blob?

    That’s rather what I thought. I’m clutching at straws here because my attempts at drilling the hands of 15mm pikemen and replacing their pikes with piano wire have been totally unsuccessful.

    in reply to: Other Russian Matters #182015
    Avatar photoGeneral Slade
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    The previous heading (Leib-Uralsk Century) is about cavalry but it all comes under the main heading of ‘Leib-Garde’.  If you look at the next sub-heading –  ‘Metalwork’ – Pavlovsk miter plates are mentioned, which is clearly a reference to infantry.  Also, the cavalry were armed with carbines not muskets and, as far as I am aware, the cavalry regiments didn’t have centre and flank companies as such (though lancer regiments did have a small number of men on each flank who were armed with rifled carbines).

    in reply to: Other Russian Matters #181996
    Avatar photoGeneral Slade
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    I assumed this only referred to light infantry regiments (or were you making a joke and I missed the point? – always a possibility).

    in reply to: Rules for Hoplites warfare #181301
    Avatar photoGeneral Slade
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    I haven’t played them but the Perfect Captain website offers a set of rules designed specifically for hoplite warfare: http://perfectcaptain.50megs.com/hoplomachia.html

    Avatar photoGeneral Slade
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    Thank you so much for making this available.  Reading the history of ‘ Hyboria – the campaign that grew’ in Military Modelling was my introduction to wargaming and it is still the kind of wargames campaign I aspire to running one day (I don’t suppose I ever will but a guy can dream).

    in reply to: Tabletop RPG AARs – Style #179934
    Avatar photoGeneral Slade
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    I’m actually always interested in hearing about the mechanics and find it a bit frustrating when the AAR just provides a narrative without reflecting on how the rules determined the outcomes.

    in reply to: Origins and Facts #178948
    Avatar photoGeneral Slade
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    Damn!  Now I’ve got to repaint half my cavalry!

    in reply to: Origins and Facts #178943
    Avatar photoGeneral Slade
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    1. Aurore is definitely Vallejo German Orange. That’s the colour on the shabraques and holster covers of my Grenadiers à Cheval so I would say that is definitive. Mind you, the jury is still out on Polish crimson . . .

    It’s deep pink. Humbrol Authenticolours can’t be wrong!

    This is true. Otherwise they wouldn’t be allowed to call it ‘authentic’. But I use acrylics these days and finding a perfect match for the Humbrol version is proving a lifetime’s work.   At present I favour Gamecraft Coral but I would feel much more confident if they had called it Polish Crimson:

    And why couldn’t they call their dark green ‘French Dragoon Green’ so I could be sure I was using the right colour?

    in reply to: Origins and Facts #178941
    Avatar photoGeneral Slade
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    Aurore is definitely Vallejo German Orange.  That’s the colour on the shabraques and holster covers of my Grenadiers à Cheval so I would say that is definitive.

    Mind you, the jury is still out on Polish crimson . . .

    in reply to: Origins and Facts #178918
    Avatar photoGeneral Slade
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    And what hue is aurore anyway?

    That’s an easy one.  It’s Vallejo German Orange:

    in reply to: Placement of Standards/Flag Bearers #178790
    Avatar photoGeneral Slade
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    Hi Bandit,

    The position of flag bearers in Russian battalions was covered in detail on TMP a few years back and ‘Le Breton’, who posted most of the information, certainly seems to know his stuff:

    http://theminiaturespage.com/boards/msg.mv?id=451338

    http://theminiaturespage.com/boards/msg.mv?id=478396

    I am interested in the idea that the Austrians placed their standards at either end of the line.  Are you at liberty to reveal a source for that?  A while ago I tried to discover which company in an Austrian combined grenadier battalion carried the colours but I came up blank on that one.  I thought it would probably either be troops from the battalion commander’s regiment or those from the numerically senior regiment. However, at the time I asked even Dave Hollins, an expert in all things Austrian, wasn’t able to help me on that one (it was a while ago though so he may have uncovered something since).

    Edit:  Here is a link to a discussion on the subject. It turns out Mr Hollins gave me rather more information than I remembered and it seems likely that the standard bearer came from the same regiment as the battalion commander.

    https://www.tapatalk.com/groups/generaldebrigadefr/viewtopic.php?p=35756#p35756

    in reply to: Allosaurus harryhauseni #178602
    Avatar photoGeneral Slade
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    That is a very good-looking dinosaur.  I think I might need one of those.  I’m not sure what I’ll do with it but that doesn’t stop me needing it.

Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 644 total)