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  • in reply to: 10mm WFB or smiliar? #167551
    Mike Headden
    Participant

    😀 You do now. 😀

    I’m not sure you qualify as a “real” wargamer then Mike 😀 😀 😀

     

    Growing old is mandatory, growing up is entirely optional!

    in reply to: 10mm WFB or smiliar? #167548
    Mike Headden
    Participant

    I’ll put in a word in favour of Warmaster, which is designed around bases of strips (usually 2 strips per base) with 1 – 3 bases per unit. It is higher level than WFB, concentrating on units rather than individuals.

    I will caution that it seems to be a Marmite system that people love or loathe. In the days when getting round the table was possible, our group played the original GW rules but there is a good fan-created variant that is available online (https://www.wm-revolution.com/).

    Growing old is mandatory, growing up is entirely optional!

    in reply to: Fit out a ship with twenty oars, the best,… #167472
    Mike Headden
    Participant

    Great minds, Geof. That’s the very ship I was thinking of!

    Most of the others have lines of paddlers leaning over the side and passengers under canopies on deck. The passengers are larger and are in pairs facing each other.

    1000 black ships before Troy… Yes, please 🙂

    A friend, whose wife was also called Helen, once leaned across a restaurant table and, in an effort at being romantic, said, “Was this the face that launch’d a thousand ships, And burnt the topless towers of Ilium? Sweet Helen, make me immortal with a kiss.”

    And she said,”Are you saying I have a face like a champagne bottle?”

    Some people can’t take a compliment. 🙂

    Growing old is mandatory, growing up is entirely optional!

    in reply to: Fit out a ship with twenty oars, the best,… #167465
    Mike Headden
    Participant

    Lovely job on that, Geof! Straight out of the frescoes.

    “The steersmen’s platforms were constructed towards the stern, rather than the pointy end as intended, and an additional pair of rowers’ benches were added at the front”

    Lots of people seem to be confused, by the lion sternwork and the “Y-shaped” attachment at the back, into thinking they are seeing a figurehead and a ram. Last I looked speculation was rife as to what purpose the attachment served. An aid to steering or beaching seemed the front runners.

    I notice the crew are rowing rather than paddling. Most of the frescoes that I can recall seem to show ships being paddled. I can only recall one that is obviously being rowed. Was that a personal choice or forced on you by what figures were available?

    Whatever, beautiful piece of work.

    I wish someone made some 1/1200, or even 1/2400, scale Minoan ships. Bit of a niche market I guess, oh well.

    Growing old is mandatory, growing up is entirely optional!

    in reply to: Speedy delivery- Tumbling Dice #167239
    Mike Headden
    Participant

    Heartily agree, always had excellent service from Paul.

    A delight to chat to at conventions too.

    Growing old is mandatory, growing up is entirely optional!

    in reply to: Those Rules You Use #166670
    Mike Headden
    Participant

    I like different things about different rules.

    I like rules that are easy to learn but hard to master. But I can cope with complicated rules if they give a good game.

    I like rules that give a game that I win because I’m brilliant but lose because I was unlucky.

    I like rules that give a game that feels like the right level for the type of action being depicted. For me Warmaster plays like a battle, Warhammer plays like a brawl, for example.

    I like “roll to hit, roll to save” type mechanisms because they keep both players involved.

    I like hex movement for naval and air games but not for land ones. Despite which I’m pootering about with a set of hex grid rules for Seguko Jidai Samurai and enjoy Cruel Seas which doesn’t use a grid.

    I like learning new rules and exploring new rule mechanisms, so any game with a novel mechanic or a new twist on an old one, will grab my attention.

    I like co-op games, games where you have to co-operate but one player winds up as winner, and head-to-head games.

    I like solo, two-player and multiplayer games so rules that can cope with all three are a plus.

    I like one-off games but prefer games which are part of a campaign, so want rules that cater for both.

    Things I’ve played recently include Blitzkreig Commander, Tribal, Warmaster, 5 Parsec From Home, A Billion Suns and Poseidon’s Warriors and I’m about to try the Horizon Zero Dawn board game.

     

     

    Growing old is mandatory, growing up is entirely optional!

    in reply to: Terrain Making Service #166533
    Mike Headden
    Participant

    Yeah I can have a go at making one and see what you think. Can I be cheeky though, any chance you can pop a 3mm strip/model in the post for me as reference? I don’t have any 3mm 🙁

    Not a problem, I have lots!

    PM or email a real world address and I’ll pop something in the post.

    Cheers,

    Mike

     

    Growing old is mandatory, growing up is entirely optional!

    in reply to: Terrain Making Service #166531
    Mike Headden
    Participant

    Thanks Mike

    Some links to existing but wrong size stuff!

    https://www.2d6wargaming.com/collections/banzai-feudal-japan this is the old Mura range

    https://sarissa-precision.com/collections/japan-28mm

    https://www.paperterrain.com/oriental-buildings

    (Another) Mike

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    in reply to: Terrain Making Service #166522
    Mike Headden
    Participant

    Mike,

    I’ve been trying to source 3mm scale Japanese Senguko Jidai period buildings without success.

    I’m thinking Samurai’s House, half a dozen village houses, maybe a water mill, possibly a shop or two. Unbased so they can fit on a larger base in various configurations.

    I’m UK based so at least prohibitive postage is not a problem!

    Not sure if that fits in with your ideas?

    If so, I think you have access to my email address via this website or post a reply here.

    (Another) Mike

     

    Growing old is mandatory, growing up is entirely optional!

    in reply to: Official Lewt Topic #166431
    Mike Headden
    Participant

    In terms of gaming stuff, since I’m much enjoying the PC game, I got the Horizon:Zero Dawn board game and an expansion.

    Shhh! I’m huntin’ wabbits robot monsters!

    Alas, not my paint job … still waiting for the stuff to be delivered!

     

    Growing old is mandatory, growing up is entirely optional!

    in reply to: Crossfire WW1 table #166032
    Mike Headden
    Participant

    Can’t say I find the contrast jarring. Especially for 1918 when things were becoming more fluid. There were always sectors where the ground was not churned to mulch and where shell holes and trenches would be much starker contrast than in the seas of mud we tend to think of in relation to WW1.

    Nice set up, IMHO, which would be improved by the addition of some crests to indicate the slight undulations present in the landscape.

    Long time since I played Crossfire and our games were all set in Stalingrad.

    May you have as much fun as we did!

    Growing old is mandatory, growing up is entirely optional!

    in reply to: Kickstarter Grump!! #165692
    Mike Headden
    Participant

    I’ve backed quite a few Kickstarters (actual KS and some KS-style) and have to say my experience has been pretty good.

    Some of them have hit glitches and have delivered late but, so far, all have delivered what was promised eventually. Several of them have exceeded expectations in delivery times or freebies or, in one case, both.

    I quite like the virtual add-ons that many offer.

    I would never commit money I couldn’t afford to lose.

    If I never dealt with people manipulating the rules I’d be living in a cave, wearing animal skins and foraging for food! 🙂 🙂 🙂

    So far on Kickstarters

    Non, Rien de rien
    Non, je ne regrette rien.

    😀

    Growing old is mandatory, growing up is entirely optional!

    in reply to: Getting distracted #165568
    Mike Headden
    Participant

    An enabler? Pft! 🙂

    (with apologies to Tim Rice & Andrew Lloyd Webber and to the tune of “The Temple” in Jesus Christ Superstar)

    “Roll on up then, Thomaston,
    Come on in then, Thomaston,
    Wargames here we go again,
    Live and breathe them, Thomaston.
    Here you live then, Thomaston,
    Here you breathe then, Thomaston,
    While your projects still survive,
    You at least are still alive.
    I got things you won’t believe,
    Name your pleasure I will sell.
    I can fix your wildest needs,
    I got heaven and I got hell.
    Roll on up, for my price is down.
    Come on in for the best in town.
    Take your pick of the latest shiney.
    Take your pick, now don’t be whiney.
    What you see is what you get.
    No one’s been disappointed yet.
    Don’t be scared give them a try,
    There is nothing you can’t buy.
    Name your price, I got everything.
    Hurry it’s going fast.
    Borrow cash on the finest terms.
    Hurry now while stocks still last.
    Roll on up then, Thomaston,
    Come on in then, Thomaston,
    Wargames here we go again,
    Live and breathe them, Thomaston.
    Here you live then, Thomaston,
    Here you breathe then, Thomaston,
    While your projects still survive,
    You at least are still alive.
    I got things you won’t believe,
    Name your pleasure I will sell ….. “

    OK, OK, “Weird Al Yancovic” I am not 😀

    Growing old is mandatory, growing up is entirely optional!

    in reply to: WFB vs Others #165564
    Mike Headden
    Participant

    diff’rent strokes – I like figure removal – shows wear on the unit, the state they are in, rather than ‘absolutely fine/suddenly gone.’ Watching an especially bloody game of Infamy! Infamy! last night, (my opponent didn’t turn up) and I thought it looked really good, the thinner and thinner formations hacking at each other.

    Except that it’s not what happened, at least until gunpowder weapons got sophisticated, in most cases. At least from the accounts I’ve read.

    Casualties are fairly light until one side breaks off, in rout or retreat.

    There is much pushing, shoving, shooting, sparring and, no doubt, many injuries and some deaths and then one side realises it is going to lose and cohesion is lost and the real slaughter begins. No doubt, in the cases where we have the “We only lost 80 men and killed 8,000 of them” type reports, more of the winners troops died of their wounds in the hours, days and weeks after the battle but many others survived. The loser’s casualties die on the battlefield.

    A unit taking 10% casualties during the actual battle has usually suffered a catastrophic loss. So if your units will be routing of the battlefield once they’ve lost two or three figures  is there a need to base individually?

    I believe most battles turn on loss of cohesion and the draining of morale rather than corpses stacked like cordwood.

    As ever, if single figures and casualty removal works for you then more power to your elbow.

     

     

    Growing old is mandatory, growing up is entirely optional!

    in reply to: Getting distracted #165557
    Mike Headden
    Participant

    As I wrote in “another place” 🙂

    “I have figures in 1/3000, 1/2400, 1/1200, 2mm, 3mm or 1/600, 6mm, 10mm, 15mm, 20mm, 25mm, 28-32mm and 54mm scales.

    I have enough lead, resin and plastic to keep me busy painting and basing for decades (that I probably don’t have).

    But I am happy to keep buying items for projects current and future.

    My expenditure on new stuff is not going to break the bank and my other needs are fairly modest. No car, no foreign holidays (unless you count trips south of the border, to Stockton!)

    If I can’t find a willing opponent I’ll play solo.

    If the rules expect me to use a table three time bigger than I have, then as suggested, I’ll use figures a third of the size they expect and adjust distances accordingly.

    Experience has shown the wisdom of acquiring at least two opposing armies.

    I am finding that planning and acquiring stuff for projects I may never actually start, let alone complete, is a great joy to me.

    Excess, in moderation, shall be my watchword!”

    Growing old is mandatory, growing up is entirely optional!

    in reply to: WFB vs Others #165470
    Mike Headden
    Participant

    Mordheim was my go to fantasy skirmish game for ages and I’m still fond of it.

    For me the mechanisms make Warhammer feel like a mass brawl in a pub car park rather than a minor battle.

    Warmaster, on the other hand plays more like a small battle. If units are “whizzing about” doing their own thing and not getting smacked for it their opponents are usually doing something wrong or your armies are rather small.

    I have played and enjoyed all three, though I don’t currently play any of them.

    There are lots of rule sets out there and “I know these rules” is the worst reason to play rules I can think of but it takes all sorts and if people are having fun playing then more power to their elbow!

    Growing old is mandatory, growing up is entirely optional!

    Mike Headden
    Participant

    Firstly, all the best with this, Jose.

    Secondly, on the issue of 1/150 scale minis, the Pendraken ranges are also nominally 1/150. Their extensive range would allow those who so desired to expand both the range of armour deployed and the theatres covered.

    Growing old is mandatory, growing up is entirely optional!

    in reply to: Wargames Foundry Medieval Civilians #165040
    Mike Headden
    Participant

    They are great! I especially like the mother with two kids and the reeve/ merchant/ tax collector with the scroll.

    Growing old is mandatory, growing up is entirely optional!

    in reply to: How does super hero RPG works? #164700
    Mike Headden
    Participant

    In my, very limited, experience the superhero sessions I’ve taken part in have felt like fantasy RPGs but where every major character is a mage. Albeit mages with a very limited range of spells. Some run permanently, others require specific circumstances to trigger.

    Seems to me the trick is to have a GM who can tailor sessions to the player characters strength and weaknesses.

    Growing old is mandatory, growing up is entirely optional!

    in reply to: British Balloon Attacks #164219
    Mike Headden
    Participant

    Balloons, huh?! Well, TIL! Every time I think there are no more WW2 weirdnesses to discover, along comes another. Thanks for the post and the link.

    Growing old is mandatory, growing up is entirely optional!

    in reply to: Collection Management System for Wargamers… #163350
    Mike Headden
    Participant

    Keep track? What is this strange concept?

    I have so few painted and so many unpainted I wouldn’t waste precious painting time (rare enough as is) on tracking things.

    Good on you though for being so organised.

    Growing old is mandatory, growing up is entirely optional!

    in reply to: Campaign map movement: free vs PtP #163326
    Mike Headden
    Participant

    Last campaign I ran had no map at all.

    Set in Early Bronze Age Mesopotamia, using 6mm figures but with many rather strange proxies (Napoleonic limbered horse artillery as Battle Carts springs to mind).

    Each player had a hand of cards. One was the capital city or tribal centre and generated the bulk of the available troops. Others were things like ports, trade centres, forts, etc. which provided access to allied units or other benefits.

    Players bid one of their non-capital cards and the winner kept them. In case of a draw each retrieved their card.

    Battles were fought by taking the capital cards and shuffling them then drawing pairs who fought a DBA game.

    Six of us in the campaign, just enough room on my dining table for three 600mm square battlefields.

    Winner scored 1 point per enemy unit destroyed, others half a point and enemy generals killed scored 2 points win or lose.

    Players who felt their position was hopeless could dump any remaining region cards, lose half their points and make their hand back up to 5.

    Growing old is mandatory, growing up is entirely optional!

    in reply to: Reasons NOT to refight historical battles #163312
    Mike Headden
    Participant

    I have a horrible suspicion it would end up as a historical game with Dragon and Goblin figures.

    I am as happy to rail against fantasy rules that are “Ancients with Dragons” as I am against games where James wins at Flodden by halting the English with cannon fire and flanking them with a portion of the pike phalanx being considered historical.

    I am yet to encounter a fantasy author who understands how skirmishers work or who understand that there are differences between javelins, spears and pikes and that they don’t all count as “a pointy stick.” Since those authors are the source texts for my occasional forays into sword & sorcery gaming I expect my rules to reflect that.

    Internal consistency matters.

     

    Growing old is mandatory, growing up is entirely optional!

    in reply to: Reasons NOT to refight historical battles #163238
    Mike Headden
    Participant

    So, we agree that we get a better understanding of history by research and analytical thinking than by playing games based in the imaginations of our forebears and contemporary authors. That’s something.

    Archaeology, original sources and perhaps things like re-enactment societies allow us to expand our knowledge of history and to come up with new models for understanding the past.

    However, my point is that playing a game where Napoleon wins Waterloo or Operation Seelowe sees the fall of Britain in 1940 tell us no more about history than a game on the Fall of Gondolin.

    It may tell us something about ourselves and about our friends, how we react, what interests us, how persistent (aka obsessive) we are, what floats our boats and what motivates us. But it tells us precious little about history.

    All wargames rules are works of fiction based on the stories we tell ourselves about how warfare works and that is no less true of historical sets than it is in ones that deal with elves, dwarves or even Paint it Pink’s rather snazzy Battlemechs!

    Based on real life? “These stories are true. Only the facts have been changed to protect the innocent?

    Growing old is mandatory, growing up is entirely optional!

    Mike Headden
    Participant

    ll be honest, I really don’t see the point of this question.

    I wanted to see what people think.

    We have, I hope also proved that folks here can have diametrically opposed beliefs, put their arguments forward coherently and passionately and do so without mud slinging, ad hominem attacks or name calling.

    Long may we come together in a spirit of “I may disagree with what you say but I will defend to the death your right to ….. be wrong!”

    Growing old is mandatory, growing up is entirely optional!

    in reply to: Reasons NOT to refight historical battles #163139
    Mike Headden
    Participant

     

    I understand what he is saying too. I just don’t agree that it is fantasy. When did fantasy become something that didn’t happen as opposed to something that couldn’t happen? Are we just making up our own definitions now?

    I can imagine having had an affair with a thirty year old Claudia Schiffer (I’m showing my age here aren’t I 🙂 ). I’m real, she’s real. Does that make the affair real? Or fantasy?

     

    Growing old is mandatory, growing up is entirely optional!

    in reply to: Some sci-fi Uruk-hai #163136
    Mike Headden
    Participant

    Just showed this to a friend who is a figure painter but not gamer. His reaction was:

    “Nice fusion! We are the fighting Uruk-hai! Waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaagh!!” 🙂

    Growing old is mandatory, growing up is entirely optional!

    Mike Headden
    Participant

    Is it the genre of the game? Or the personality of the players?

    My own, admittedly limited, experience over the past half century of wargaming suggests that the latter is the norm.

    Some of us suck up as much background and peripheral information as we can to add depth to our games. Courtesy of my 6mm Early Bronze Age Mesopotamia project I know more about Sumerian boat building than anyone not doing a PhD on it (or a Sumerian boat builder!) has any need to know!

    Others just want to get toys on the table and are happy to be told their army needs to kill the guys in the blue uniforms.

    The guys who could name the beachmasters on Gold Beach could also list the orcs mentioned by name in LotR.

    Whatever the approach and whatever the genre, I still believe there is more that unites us than divides us!

    Growing old is mandatory, growing up is entirely optional!

    in reply to: Reasons NOT to refight historical battles #163103
    Mike Headden
    Participant

    Ooh! I hope we are all still friends. Disagreeing with someone and disliking them are two waaaay different things!

     

    Growing old is mandatory, growing up is entirely optional!

    in reply to: Reasons NOT to refight historical battles #163097
    Mike Headden
    Participant

    I get what you are saying Mike. I think: If you fight Waterloo and Napoleon wins, it is not historical as that is not happened in history. If you fight Waterloo and Napoleon loses, but captures Hougoumont, it is not historical as that is not happened in history. Once something happens in your game that did not happen in real life history, you are saying it then becomes fantasy/sci-fi/imaginations, whatever you will, as it is no longer a reflection of actual history? In the above they are historical settings but with a non factual (fantasy etc) outcome?

    Exactly so Mike.

    I’m not saying that people shouldn’t play such games, just that they should be honest with themselves about what they are doing.

    A group of us have played a couple of campaigns set between Stalingrad and Kursk in the years before covid put a stop to us meeting face-to-face. The formations were fictional, as was the terrain, but they were plausible forces based on real world TO&Es with equipment available in the period.

    We also played fantasy campaigns where fictional forces of High Elves, Dark Elves, Orcs, Undead and a few flavours of humans battled for dominance.

    Frankly I don’t see the difference.

    We shared a reasonably common view of how such warfare might be conducted in both cases. We all agreed that Tiger tanks were better armed and armoured than T34s and that dragons were better armed and armoured than giant eagles and so on.

    In both cases, we won some, we lost some and we had fun. Which is surely the point of it all.

    But I remain baffled as to why some seem to think that their games are more “real” than ours.

    Growing old is mandatory, growing up is entirely optional!

    in reply to: Reasons NOT to refight historical battles #163062
    Mike Headden
    Participant

    But all those options locked out by the immutability of the event are open in a historical wargame.

    But then it’s not historical.

    To  say “I play WW2 games because I like the period and the figures and the rules but not Science Fiction ones because the rules don’t grab me and I don’t want to have to come up with paint jobs and the figures are a fiddle to put together” makes perfect sense to me but the idea that one is “real” and the other not baffles me utterly.

     

     

    Growing old is mandatory, growing up is entirely optional!

    in reply to: Reasons NOT to refight historical battles #163056
    Mike Headden
    Participant

    unless you think all history is predetermined.

    The Moving Finger writes; and, having writ, Moves on: nor all thy Piety nor Wit Shall lure it back to cancel half a Line, Nor all thy Tears wash out a Word of it.

    Predetermined, no, but once a thing has happened it is immutable. All other options are lost.

    Unless you believe, as some do, that there are infinite universes and that anything that could happen does happen, causing endless branching realities.

    Or is that too science fiction?

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Growing old is mandatory, growing up is entirely optional!

    in reply to: Reasons NOT to refight historical battles #163038
    Mike Headden
    Participant

    You’ve missed out my main reason. We Know What Happened!

    Wrote this on the Pendraken forum but thought it bore repeating here.

    The moment Jerome takes Hougoumont at the first attempt or the first wave at Sword Beach are wiped out in their landing craft by accurate German artillery fire or the Nervii kill Caesar and his bodyguard and his blood flows into the river Selle or whatever we are into fantasy territory as firmly as any game with dragons, unicorns and elves.

    If you refight a battle and it doesn’t follow the historical path you, or your rules, have missed something.

    If it does, why bother?

    So, fictional battles, with plausible fictional forces are my usual fare. No batteries of Karl Morsers in action, though I have used one as an objective once and as off table artillery a couple of times (you get one shot per game, make it count!). My two Maus models have seen action in my “Last Stand At Kummersdorf” scenario a few times. They are usually bogged down, broken down or knocked out by turn three!

    That said, I’ve had plenty of fun with New Kingdom Egyptians taking on Samurai and the like in my time

    Growing old is mandatory, growing up is entirely optional!

    in reply to: Playing The Game #162839
    Mike Headden
    Participant

    Board Games: online, four times a week with friends and family.

    Tabletop: When I can, solo, at home, on the dining table, with a 1220x1800mm “lid” where required.

    Computer Games: Pretty much every day, even if only to do the daily tasks in MMORPGs.

    I am still staying home as much as possible.

     

    Growing old is mandatory, growing up is entirely optional!

    in reply to: (One of) King Solomon’s Mines #162594
    Mike Headden
    Participant

    Alternative Armies (http://www.alternative-armies.com) do 15mm skeletons and skulls, though the skeletons are moulded to a base. No idea if they would be useful.

    Current months freebie from them is a set of skeletons and skulls.

    Growing old is mandatory, growing up is entirely optional!

    in reply to: New release perfect six miniatures #162565
    Mike Headden
    Participant

    Now, THERE’S service! 🙂

    Growing old is mandatory, growing up is entirely optional!

    in reply to: New release perfect six miniatures #162549
    Mike Headden
    Participant

    Order placed! 🙂

    Growing old is mandatory, growing up is entirely optional!

    in reply to: New release perfect six miniatures #162545
    Mike Headden
    Participant

    Well, my Sumerian farmyards deffo need some chickens.

    Must put a modest order together.

    Growing old is mandatory, growing up is entirely optional!

    in reply to: I am the LORE!!! #162527
    Mike Headden
    Participant

    I am already a heretic in that I play Warmaster (aka Warhamster) not Warhammer, though it is at least still 10mm.

    Even so, are you suggesting I may have transgressed in particpating in the High Elf, Dark Elf and Orc alliance (aka The Liberators) that swept all before it in a campaign a couple of years ago?

    How about my Warmaster “Great Marienburg Crusade” army?

    The “Wyld Wood” army of rats, wolves, bears, dryads, treemen, druids and Herne the Hunted?

    Yeah,I’m not a great one for other peoples backgrounds 🙂

     

    Growing old is mandatory, growing up is entirely optional!

    in reply to: Another Five Leagues Affair #162365
    Mike Headden
    Participant

    Good looking game – I especially like the barrows.

    Good write up too.

    On the quality of the opposition. The good guys deserve at least the occasional break. After all, otherwise they’d give up and go do something mundane but safe. 🙂

     

     

    Growing old is mandatory, growing up is entirely optional!

Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 594 total)