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  • in reply to: 3mm Ogre Miniatures: New Project #13844

    The Ogre is almost exactly 50 scale feet long – that’s 24 millimeters and some change. A “real” Ogre Mk III is 58 feet long, so pretty square on the money for mass and size, considering that my Ogre is a tad wider and chunkier.

    The Plasmablast 6mm stuff could make great Ogre MK Is and Ogre Mk IIs, I think.

    We get slapped around, but we have a good time!

    in reply to: 3mm Ogre Miniatures: New Project #13805

    Get me the chassis and I’ll do the kitbash.

     

    We get slapped around, but we have a good time!

    in reply to: 3mm Ogre Miniatures: New Project #13803

    Well, I just messaged Marcin. He’s been very cool about this in the past and I know he wants to do an ogre-style vehicle, so…

    I’ll make you an ogre as soon as I can get some chassis.

    We get slapped around, but we have a good time!

    in reply to: 3mm Ogre Miniatures: New Project #13793

    I love that ogre, Mathieu! Is it yours? That needs to be sent to Marcin’s attention, post-haste!

    I’d happily make you an ogre, but I have no more Plasmablast chasis available! When they get production going again, I’ll do one up for you.

    Yes, O8 is Oddzial Osmy. It means “8th Army”, so…

    We get slapped around, but we have a good time!

    in reply to: Free Infinity Figure #13591

    I’d love another one of their more robotic figs to turn into a titan for 3mm scifi, but asking you to send it to Brazil is not fair.

    We get slapped around, but we have a good time!

    in reply to: How small would you go? #13385

    Well, Dave, I also invested pretty heavily in 2mm Napoleonics, basing huge armies for Volley & Bayonet. I have bought 3mm stuff to do battalion level games.

    You might want to consider 3mm in any case. I know that the detail bonus o er 2mm makes all thndifference for me.

     

    We get slapped around, but we have a good time!

    in reply to: How small would you go? #13174

    Frankly, Mathieu, I enjoy <i>Black Powder. </i>simple, yes, basic, yes, but for that reason easy to learn, easy to play and easy to modify.

    I also have LaSalle, Longstreet and Napoleon at War. The last two look particularly promising, but I haven’t played them yet.

    We get slapped around, but we have a good time!

    in reply to: How small would you go? #13072

    Dear Yorkie,

    Not to belabor the point, but the great thing about picoscale is that there is no “too heavy investment” in other scales… Unless you’ve got all other periods covered in 6mm.

    Again, maybe 6mm Napoleonics is your big thing. Fair go. But you watch Aliens and think it would be cool to do a one-off game. Twenty bucks will get you enough figs to do a nice little battle on a 3×2 mat. I wouldn’t want to try individual figure-based skirmishes in 3mm, but fireteam based skirmishes are certainly doable!

    Like I said, it is something of a bonus scale because it is cheap, easy to paint, and easy to store. It is also a great scale for producing micodioramas to give away as gifts.

    It is ridiculously easy to buy and paint these things. My biggest problem so far has been buying too much! I have far more sci-fi stuff then I could ever conceivably use, but I keep on buying more!

    My latest project is to do Steve Jackson’s Ogre in 3mm. 40 bucks of figures gets you more than enough, and that is counting the expen$$$ive Plasmablast 6mm tanks I use as Ogres.

    We get slapped around, but we have a good time!

    in reply to: How small would you go? #13055

    I am 47 years old and my vision sucks. It is no harder painting 3mm figs than it is, say, painting belts on 28 mm figs. Like everything in minis, it is a question of tecnique and not one of eagle eye sight and rock steady hands.

    Paint for effect, not detail. That is the key.

    O8’s 3mm figures are about 200 percent more detailed and recognizeable than Irregular’s 2mm figs.

     

     

    We get slapped around, but we have a good time!

    in reply to: How small would you go? #13030

    I have been painting 3mm almost literally since the first day they were available. I have extensive WWII, Modern and Sci-Fi collections and I have posted quite a lot about this scale over at my blog, which contains painting, basing and terrain tips. http://leadnobleed.blogspot.com.br/2012/12/what-do-3mm-figures-really-look-like.html

    To put it simply, there are plenty of good reasons to game in 3mm, most of which have been touched on above (space, the ability to game big battles, etc.) My favorite, which hasn’t been mentioned yet, is affordability, which makes this scale somewhat of a “bonus” scale to any gamer, in that you can get into it essentially for free.

    A pack of 3mm O8 WWII tanks runs 4.50 USD for 15 castings. Ten packs will give you enough troops for a battalion-sized game of Blitzkrieg Commander which can be played on your coffee table and stored in a shoe box. And, unless you are REALLY detail minded, you can get everything painted up in a weekend, with the terrain done on another weekend.

    A six company French 1813 infantry battalion with 180 figures (i.e. 1:4 scale) costs five dollars. 3.50 if you go with four base battalions. Compare that to a 32 dollar box of Warlord figures. For the price of one box of warlord’s admittedly maravelous 28mm stuff, you can field a six squadron cavalry regiment, four entire artillery batteries, and a five battalion infantry brigade! And you can paint everything in an afternoon!

    One should not think of 3mm as competition for larger figs, but rather as a complimentary scale. It allows one to do cheap, fast projects in periods or areas one normally wouldn’t go into. For example, I have wanted to play Napoleonics ever since I got into wargaming, but the thought of putting together and painting the necessary figs was just too daunting. This is no problem whatsoever in 3mm scale, however! Just during my off time at the World Cup, I was able to paint and field an entire French army. Awhile back, I wanted to do a Venezuelan invasion of Colombia: 50 bucks of O8 figs was enough to set me up.

    3mm French Army

    Finally, of course, this is THE scale for nice looking, easily portable games. Many wags say “Hell, if you go 3mm, you are practically boardgaming”. First of all, that’s not true (see my above link comparing counters to 3mm stands). But secondly, even if it were true, so what? A boardgame can be carried in a backpack, friend, with room left over for a book, an iPad and sixpack. Idem 3mm. Even my deluxe set up consists of a flocked terrain mat wrapped around a pvc pipe and two shoeboxes of terrain and figures. This is a bad thing? Only if you are a hugely wealthy git with an SUV and a dedicated wargames room! A DBA set up can easily be completely stored in a shoebox in 3mm.

    Now yes, there are problems with 3mm. One of them is that, to be as spectacular as the larger scales, real thought must be given to terrain. Your battles are going to look somewhat like Osprey maps and not like toy collections. This is not necessarily a bad thing.

    The real problem, however, is that you need to develop an entirely new painting and basing technique for these. Painting needs to be MUCH lighter and basing much simpler, with finer grain or even no flocking. You can see my eight years of travails over at the Lead Doesn’t Bleed blog. However, now that many people have developed the techniques you need to use and posted them, you won’t have to go through the troubles I had. You can find a discussion about these tips and techniques here on TWW at: http://www.thewargameswebsite.com/forums/topic/painting-3mm-1600-vehicles-and-figures/

    In conclusion, I find 3mm to be a wholly rewarding, cost-effective and lovely scale. There is literally nothing to not like about it, except for the fact that it isn’t 28mm… But that is precisely the point! With regards to 3mm versus 6mm, well, that is perhaps a matter of taste, but again, one typically gets three times the number of 3mm castings for something like half the price, so I would say that, if anything, it is even more cost effective to play in 3mm versus 6mm than 3mm versus 28mm.

    Given that you can buy a complete army in 3mm for the price of one Games Wankshop blister pack, I very much urge gamers to try this new scale out! You have literally nothing to lose but the price of one cheap dinner for two!

     

     

     

     

    We get slapped around, but we have a good time!

    I would presume that the powerplant and equipment needed to provide lift would take up about as much space as tread-based movement would. So what you shouldn’t do is just plane off the treads and slap a skirt on it. As Mathieu says, the entire thing needs to clear the ground, so the tank would need to hold all that powerplant and drive equipment and hover it at a level that clears reasonably sized obstacles on the ground. So the skirts need to be wide, for the reasons Mathieu points out, and probably thick as well. In any case, the bottom half of the hull still needs to be there, raised up above the ground, and not replaced with a thin skirt.

    We get slapped around, but we have a good time!

    Here’s the 15mm Wombat, from Ground Zero games, for example:

    It looks like it has a bumber car skirt attached to it.

    Here’s another offender: the Mao Zehdong from Brigade:

    And here are two ways of doing it right. The classic GEV from Ogre:

    …and the Hammer’s Slammers combat cars:

    Compare that image, in particular, to TNCE’s not-a-Hammer’s combat car:

    We get slapped around, but we have a good time!

    in reply to: AB's 6mm sci-fi topic #12119

    I~ll be sure to keep a sharp eye out for them, then. I like the amount of character you put into your pieces, I just prefer less exagerated sculpting styles. I know that~s probably a contradiction at 6mm, but… [shrugs] Then again, what do I know about these macroscales? 😀

    We get slapped around, but we have a good time!

    in reply to: AB's 6mm sci-fi topic #12110

    Here you go:

    Basically, more realistic proportions and a more near-modern look.

    We get slapped around, but we have a good time!

    in reply to: AB's 6mm sci-fi topic #12086

    Oooh a challenge! What would the elusive 6mm infantry look like?

    Not to denigrate your style, Mike. I know it’s based on 1980s British sci-fi comics and it is very evocative of that. But what I’d like is some infantry in 6mm that looks something like the neo-Poles produced by Oddzial Osmy. If I could get those, I’d snap them up, along with Dark Star’s vehicles and your buildings, and be playing 6mm skirmish in no time.

    We get slapped around, but we have a good time!

    Thanks, folks!

    Old school sci-fi was the vibe I was trying for, specifically this here:

    The paint job looks a lot smoother in rela life. My softwear’s autocorrect filter kinda roughed it up, especially around the wheels.

    Mr. Average, Javelin says he’s looking to cast some of this stuff. I don’t think his whole line is worthy of the honor, but these here certainly are.

    We get slapped around, but we have a good time!

    in reply to: Old Guard Flags? #11128

    I think those small flags are company fanions, though, not battalion fanions.

    In the rest of the French Army, post 1811, the system worked like this: 1st battalion got the tricolor and each successive battalion got a primarily colored fanion (plus those little gunbarrel fanions, used apparently as company markers, were used by everyone).

    In the Guards, the OG regiments were considered to be the 1st battalions for their respective establishments, so apparently the first battalion of the OG regiments carried an eagle and a tricolor. There’s no consensus on whether the SECOND regiment of the OG establishment also carried an eagle and a tricolor. Consensus seems to indicate that they did until after the Russia fiasco, but perhaps not after then. I certainly would have no objection to modeling them that way.

    All MG and YG batalions supposedly had fanions, one per battalion.

    OK, fair go.

    But what I want to know is, what did the SECOND battalions of the OG regiments carry, if anything? Fanions? If so, what color? Tricolors? Nothing…?

    We get slapped around, but we have a good time!

    in reply to: AB's 6mm sci-fi topic #11016

    Beautiful stuff, man! Every time I see your set-up. it pushes me that much closer to 6mm sci-fi skirmish. Tho only reason I haven’t succumbed so far is that I don’t like any of the 6mm infantry out there. But I’m getting closer and closer… Planetfall might actually push me into 10mm, using 6mm terrain.

    We get slapped around, but we have a good time!

    in reply to: Hapsburg Empire – why no Imperial Guard? #11009

    Because the Hapsburgs were just too cool for that sort of candy-ass crap. When your nobility sponsors your armies regiments, you have no need for a guard. Every soldier is, in theory, some noble person’s guard. 🙂

    We get slapped around, but we have a good time!

    in reply to: Painting 3mm (1/600) vehicles and figures #9281

    The Badger and Caesarion are a blast to paint!  My Mantas, unfortunately, came with some mold line up problems.

    But here are some of my Caesarions:


    I thought I had some photos of my Badger-supported power infantry company, but I guess not. Time to take some…

    We get slapped around, but we have a good time!

    in reply to: Painting 3mm (1/600) vehicles and figures #9273

    It’s good stuff you do, HPhD!

    We get slapped around, but we have a good time!

    in reply to: 3mm Austrians for Black Powder #9062

    Dude! Mark Severin, Bryce Allen and Henry Hyde like my figs? I’m stoked! 😀

    Thanks for the kind commentary, folks.

    I’m now working on a Hungarian regiment, which is fun because the blue pants really make them pop! Next up after them is one more German foot regiment and then I get to work on the light brigade.

    That will be a real pain because it’ll 12 squadrons of light cavalry, along with two Grenzer battalions and a Jaeger battalion. I’m using ACW Confederate skirmishers for the Jaeger and I hope they turn out acceptable. If Marcin ever makes some Austrian landwher figs, I’ll swap those in.

    I figure the Chevauxlegers will be green. I know that’s not precisely historical, but at this scale, I need to be able to distinguish the units at a glance. Given that the Chevauxlegers and the Cuirassiers use the same castings and the heavy cavalry will be white… well, green it is. The Cuirassiers will have dark horses and Chevaulegers browns and bays, just to further the identification.

    My justification for all this is that my games take place in a neighboring dimension. They’re not quite different enough to be “Imaginations”, but it does explain why a Chevauxleger regiment has green uniforms in 1813, for example, or why all the French Fusiliers have blue pom-poms. It’s the easiest way to discourage the button counters, I’ve found (well, that and playing in 3mm in the first place).

    When the light brigade is finally done, I’ll have enough for a small but decent game, which I hope to play sometime at the beginning of 2015, just to acclimate myself to the Black Powder rules.

    Then I’ll get to work on the Guard brigades for both armies.

     

    We get slapped around, but we have a good time!

    in reply to: Painting 3mm (1/600) vehicles and figures #9028

    I wish I had known about that Hornby fine flock when I was up in England last month! It looks perfect for 1/600. Does it come in other colors?

    We get slapped around, but we have a good time!

    in reply to: Painting 3mm (1/600) vehicles and figures #9027

    Thanks, Cdr Luddite!

    I agree about scenic materials. The finer, the better. In fact, you might want to think about using none at all, too.

    Recently, I have decided to go with simplicity in my basing schemes. This has made my figs better, IMHO. At 3mm scale, it is far too easy to distract the eye by using multiple flockings and basing grit. You can see that happening above with that WWII carrier platoon. The Pz IIIs, on the other hand, are just fine, even with not flocking at all.

    If you must use tufts or static grass at this scale, use them very sparingly!

     

    We get slapped around, but we have a good time!

    in reply to: 3mm Austrians for Black Powder #8975

    No tricornes as of yet, William, but Marcin promises that they are “coming soon”. I’m looking forward to them, myself.

    Another advantage to 3mm is that you can pretty much play all periods cheaply and easily. We now have Napoleonics, ACW, the World Wars, Modern and Ultra-modern, Sci-fi and now even Romans and (soon) Celts!

    Musket and Pike and the early black powder period are the only major hold outs, so far.

    3mm armies are rather like Pokemon: gotta catch ’em all!

    We get slapped around, but we have a good time!

    in reply to: Painting 3mm (1/600) vehicles and figures #8949

    Sure! Thanks! Figured something like that must’ve happened. Any idea why all those “div” markers are in the post?

    We get slapped around, but we have a good time!

    in reply to: 3mm Austrians for Black Powder #8889

    Coming from Mark Severin, that is high praise, indeed! Thank you, sir! 😀

     

    We get slapped around, but we have a good time!

    in reply to: 3mm Austrians for Black Powder #8860

    Close-ups!

    Now you can see the shakos! The yellow pom-poms are exagerated, but that’s normal at this scale: everything has to be that much brighter and over-the-top to be seen at arm’s length. It is definitely painting for effect in 3mm!

    We get slapped around, but we have a good time!

    in reply to: Union Commander: The First Upheaval in Europe #8272

    What are you going to use for the M-76s? Kit-bashed M-577s? I’d love to see those!

    We get slapped around, but we have a good time!

    in reply to: Can we talk SF "infantry" weapons? #8113

    I’ve been thinking about this for awhile in conjunction with my Luftpanzer fast-play sci-fi rules.

    I really think that, when you get right down to it, there are only two main axises of differentiation for sci-fi weapons: direct/indirect and area/precision.

    Direct weapons are those things that shoot in a straight line and thus can be easily blocked by intervening terrain and other obstacles.

    Indirect weapons are those which can be fired in a parabola or which can change trajectories.

    Precision  weapons hit one target and tend to hit it heavily.

    Area weapons hit many targets within an area and tend to do in not so heavily (at least as compared with precision weapons).

    One could also rate these as light, medium, heavy and superheavy. I’m rating them on a 1-6 scale.

    So, let’s look at some weapons:

    Direct precision weapons would be gauss guns, lasers, machine- or chainguns, cannon, etc.

    Direct area weapons would be plasma or fusion guns, flame throwers.

    Indirect area weapons would be mortars, artillery and all sorts of things that fly and go “boom”. Traveller’s ole meson cannons also fit here.

    Indirect precision weapons could be anti-tank guided missiles. It could also be something like the wild laser wands used in Christopher Hinz’s “Paratwa” novels.

    This means that if you wanted to do a rules set, you could classify every weapon according to those four categories on a variable strength scale.

     

     

    We get slapped around, but we have a good time!

    You need to give one of them a Madsen light machinegun. We will never be rid of the things here in Brazil…

     

    http://www.warrelics.eu/forum/world-firearms/portuguese-contract-madsen-lmg-321854/

    We get slapped around, but we have a good time!

    in reply to: Union Commander: The First Upheaval in Europe #6462

    Just beautiful stuff! I’m bummed you drew those sillouhettes, though, because I was hoping that there was a technological end-run around drawing… 🙂

     

    We get slapped around, but we have a good time!

    in reply to: Union Commander: The First Upheaval in Europe #6452

    Looks wonderful! How did you get the silhouettes?

    With regards to the organization, however, I’d make the company three 4 or 5 tank platoons, plus two command tanks. Not only os this more normal from a TO&E point of view (command vehicles are generally seperate from combat platoons), but you also really need one command unit for every 6-8 combat units in FWC. Also, if you are going 1:1 scale, I think you can designate a unit to be a commander, thus making your command blowers about the same as your regular blowers.

    We get slapped around, but we have a good time!

Viewing 33 posts - 1,561 through 1,593 (of 1,593 total)