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Viewing 23 posts - 1 through 23 (of 23 total)
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  • in reply to: 6mm Star Trek Ground Operations? #133853
    John
    Participant

    Plenty of Body Armour around in the TOS movies: art like this would be very useful!

    To model the effect of Nuclear weapons on the wargaming table, apply jerry can of fuel to board, light match and stand well back.

    in reply to: A9 / Cruiser MK 1 on the gaming table #79668
    John
    Participant

    Say what you want about the A9, but when they roll onto a civil war battlefield in 1938 they certainly pack a punch! Within the fairly anti-tank gun free realm of VBCW, those early Cruiser Tanks are perfectly suited to dominate the battlefield, with their only real counters being other Tanks or petrol bombs. That being said, there are very few Tanks out there that won’t quite quickly knock out a cruiser tank.

    Still, three Vickers machine guns on one mount are fun while they last.

    To model the effect of Nuclear weapons on the wargaming table, apply jerry can of fuel to board, light match and stand well back.

    in reply to: Thank you! #56333
    John
    Participant

    Fantastic forum, fantastic people and fantastic topics.

    (Only wish I had the time to comment more…)

    To model the effect of Nuclear weapons on the wargaming table, apply jerry can of fuel to board, light match and stand well back.

    in reply to: Sexism in Rules? #53671
    John
    Participant

    I’m still confused to why there is section in a book about writing wargames’ rules on pronoun use, as if it is a problem exclusively found in wargaming and thus can be treated with the usual wargamers dry wit and sarcasm which often veils a profound statement. I’m pretty sure if they’d left that section out no one would be writing emails complaining. All Mr Priestly and Mr Lambshead did was highlight the fact that they still think they’re writing for the same demographics that existed 20 or 30 years’ ago.

    I mean come on.HG Wells titled his Bible of wargaming “<i>Little Wars: a game for boys from twelve years of age to one hundred and fifty and for that more intelligent sort of girl who likes boys’ games and books“. </i>While this is a fair bit more patronising (and possibly sexist)than one would like today, it’s a far sight better than “practically all tabletop wargames enthusiasts are male“.

    If you really can’t do better for equality than 1913, then why bother.

    To model the effect of Nuclear weapons on the wargaming table, apply jerry can of fuel to board, light match and stand well back.

    in reply to: Time Commanders #53481
    John
    Participant

    Richard Hammond’s a bit busy at the moment, but it’s good to get this kind of thing back on TV.

    Found a small clip from monday’s show.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p04jrryf

    To model the effect of Nuclear weapons on the wargaming table, apply jerry can of fuel to board, light match and stand well back.

    in reply to: SELWG 2016-Tussle Near Trumpton #50105
    John
    Participant

    Lions,of course!

    • This reply was modified 4 years, 7 months ago by John.

    To model the effect of Nuclear weapons on the wargaming table, apply jerry can of fuel to board, light match and stand well back.

    in reply to: Show Games #49568
    John
    Participant

    My dad and I are running our second show game at SELWG this year, and the key reason we wanted to do this in the first place was to show other people what we do, to promote a period,and for fun. If I use our planned AVBCW game as an example,(Self promotion warning) when we got the table in June, we had all the forces, almost all the scenery, but no rules! So our summer holiday was spent creating, writing and testing the rules on my hapless friends in order to get something out that worked. Considering the time constraints we were both under (He’s out of the country more often than not, and I row competitively) we could have just abandoned it and pulled out. But we were having a lot of fun with every part of the process.

    To model the effect of Nuclear weapons on the wargaming table, apply jerry can of fuel to board, light match and stand well back.

    in reply to: Forgive me, a slight rant #33362
    John
    Participant

    Ah, uniform Nazis. That special wargame sub-type who think that ‘accuracy’ is the be all and end all.

    Ha! You should have seen the indignation on the face of a gentleman running a Waterloo game when I mentioned that his wonderfully painted Britih foot Guards at were;

    1. Probably wearing greatcoats
    2. If they weren’t, the dye in the new coats had probably turned the white crossbelts and facings pink

     

    To model the effect of Nuclear weapons on the wargaming table, apply jerry can of fuel to board, light match and stand well back.

    in reply to: Total Destruction #30911
    John
    Participant

    Not entirely related,but my dad had a friend, who insisted that a friend of his broke his arm due to a wargame!

    Apparently they were playing a rather heated Russian front game,and one section of the board had become the climax of the game. The whole game ran on one set of dice. ( Thoughout the several hours beforehand he had been sipping through a bottle of whisky) .All did not go well, and the dice went against him. He springs back in shock and suprise, and topples back off his chair onto the floor, and had to go to casualty. My dad’s friend then had to explain to the doctors how exactly he managed to brake his arm.

    On another note, my godfather has a more fitting story- He had spent 3 months painting up a full force of figures for a big game for november 5th, to portray a running battle in the cellars under parliament in the hunt for guy Fawkes.All that needed to be done was for the figures to be spray varnished and left out to dry in the garden. So he takes them outside, sets them up and gives them a good coat of… White undercoat.

    To model the effect of Nuclear weapons on the wargaming table, apply jerry can of fuel to board, light match and stand well back.

    in reply to: How Big Are Your 6mm Game Tables? #28120
    John
    Participant

    I use four 2’x4′ to run various sizes of table in 6mm, and yet usually it seems like there is never enough space . . .

    To model the effect of Nuclear weapons on the wargaming table, apply jerry can of fuel to board, light match and stand well back.

    in reply to: So What Was Wrong With Enterprise? #27667
    John
    Participant

    My problems were the fact it felt like the writers never watched any other star trek or paid attention to any canon events.

    Where were the primitive nuclear weapons?

    Why did they have phasers? Or tricorders?

    Why do we see the romulans?

    Why are we still at peace with the klingons?

    What also didn’t help was the whole chunk of early warp travel where what seem like hundreds of intrepid explorers go blindy out into the galaxy leaving their books behind, creating scenarios like a piece of the action or Friendship One?

    Nope, just the only ship in the quadrant managing to get into more space battles than more gung ho Kirk did.

    To model the effect of Nuclear weapons on the wargaming table, apply jerry can of fuel to board, light match and stand well back.

    in reply to: A setting idea I have had and its development #27666
    John
    Participant

    I think the point that some of us are missing here is the “fiction” part of science fiction. If you’re going to suspend disbelief by adding alien life, you might as well keep going.

    Idea wise, suspension of disbelief is required to make science fiction work in the first place.In my opinion, it doesn’t matter how enlightened you think you are, they’ll always be some moron who thinks that conquest is the answer, or someone who will look down on whoever they want to.

    On the subject of H bombs and meteorite warfare, even if you’ve only launched an attack for material gain, you’re going to a far higher inconvenience than is necessary- like using flamethrower to clear snails from a lettuce patch. And if it’s conquest for territory? It’s difficult to build anything in a cratered-filled ,irradiated landscape, unless it is a reminder of home (which realistically for sentient intelligence it can’t ) .

     

    To model the effect of Nuclear weapons on the wargaming table, apply jerry can of fuel to board, light match and stand well back.

    in reply to: Reading suggestions for North Africa #25615
    John
    Participant

    The Crucible of War 1- Wavell’s Command by Barrie Pitt- great book on the path of the Desert war until the removal of Gen. Wavell.

    The Tank War by Mark Urban – The First half of this book is a very insightful view of life and fighting in the %th RTR in the desert created from interviews , memoirs and diary entries. The Second half of the book isn’t half bad either.

    To model the effect of Nuclear weapons on the wargaming table, apply jerry can of fuel to board, light match and stand well back.

    in reply to: What are the good podcasts nowadays? #25551
    John
    Participant

    I’d whole-heartedly recommend these below:

    1- Three Moves ahead by Trot Goodfellow and Rob Zacny – more of a computer gaming podcast, but their discussion of tactics and game design are very good, and they do dabble in board and miniature wargaming in their previous shows.

    2-The History of the Great War by Wesley Livesay- Pretty self explanatory, with roughly half-hour run time.

    3-When Diplomacy Fails by Zack Twamley – this podcast on the diplomacy of war covers a range of wars from the Punic Wars to the First World War in a relatively impartial lighthearted manner.

    4-The History of WWII Podcast by Ray Harris – Very well written with easily available sources and in depth study of  every part of the conflict. Three years in and he’s only reached the end of Battleaxe, so I’m looking forward to his coverage of Barbarossa.

    To model the effect of Nuclear weapons on the wargaming table, apply jerry can of fuel to board, light match and stand well back.

    in reply to: Out of touch view of young gamers #24068
    John
    Participant

    I do think introducing young people is one of the challenges and honestly, a lot of us writers do a bad job of it. There’s an art to playing games with kids where you balance between taking them seriously and letting them engage with the game, and not overwhelming them on the other hand.

    As one of those you would describe as young (15) , I should point out that you’re not doing as bad a job as you think.

    When I was younger I remember being practically escorted around model railway shows, with grumpy men shouting at me to stand well away, fearing the wrath of the sticky hands of clumsy children, and the assumption that we don’t know what X is or what Y does. The same has not been true of wargamers, especially at shows like Salute – there are more participation games with an appeal to the younger generation, and there is no sense of patronisation from the runners of the games – though I have at certain points been able to correct some people on the errors that they seem to think they can get pass me!

    Of course you are aided by picking games that they can relate to. Running WW2 skirmish games with scenarios that are blatantly recognisable from games and television, you can involve us lot with a topic we know about. It’s no use trying to interest us in the Austro-Prussian war if the only time we heard of it was a brief mention in a friday afternoon history lesson , but WW2 air combat? Tank skirmishing, like World of Tanks. These should be the games that you try them out on.Don’t think we only played fantasy, science fiction or zombie games, as many have thought (and said) of me. Don’t assume that as we have poor attention span, you can’t explain stuff to us in full. We don’t. If we can play Total war for 6 hours, and then manage to get through school without any trouble, we can deal with you explaining why the soviets have poor command control. Just don’t overdo it.

    Last and not least, give us a bridgehead into the hobby. If appropriate, tell them where you got the figures/scenery, and how you prepared and painted them. We like to know, and usually our parent’s wallets can take the battering.

    I’m not saying you’re doing a bad job. Not at all. At Salute this year me and my mate Ed had a great game of Dogger bank by a group whose name I have forgotten completely about. Considering their game was not really targeted towards the younger ages, they avoided patronisation and arrogance in their wake, as I have dealt with in the past.

    You’re doing fine.

    To model the effect of Nuclear weapons on the wargaming table, apply jerry can of fuel to board, light match and stand well back.

    in reply to: Any interest in a voice chat meeting? #19134
    John
    Participant

    My experience in Voice chat during computer gaming is it turns in 3 mad conversations at once, or awkward silence.

    Though those do involve teenagers.

    To model the effect of Nuclear weapons on the wargaming table, apply jerry can of fuel to board, light match and stand well back.

    in reply to: Your most obscure project? #19133
    John
    Participant

    1/2400 Pre Dreadnoughts. Ordered tow whole navies from the US, had moved onto Chain of command by the time they arrived (4 months!) and they are still sitting in a box in their undercoats.

    To model the effect of Nuclear weapons on the wargaming table, apply jerry can of fuel to board, light match and stand well back.

    in reply to: Favourite Military Vehicle #11789
    John
    Participant

    Vickers VI- only the British could come up with a tank so ridiculously fast and lightly armoured, and still use it in battle!

    KV-VI : No explanation needed . . .

     

     

    • This reply was modified 6 years, 6 months ago by John.

    To model the effect of Nuclear weapons on the wargaming table, apply jerry can of fuel to board, light match and stand well back.

    in reply to: Steam names #8195
    John
    Participant

    Neveray if you’re looking, play the entire Wargame Franchise, War Thunder and EUIV.

    To model the effect of Nuclear weapons on the wargaming table, apply jerry can of fuel to board, light match and stand well back.

    in reply to: Rules Recommendation? #7754
    John
    Participant

    If one can grab an old copy of Brigade level fire and fury, it’s doesn’t take a lot of conversion to scale up to a division per unit. ( most civil war brigades were quite small, so it might save some time)However if you can’t get your hand son a copy a set I just bought is Feuer und Furia Francese, which runs along the same sort of lines as Fire and Fury, but with enough variations in dice rolls and weapons stats to cover from 1840-1880. For £8.70 it offers the rules plus supplements for Crimea, Italy 1859, 1866 and 1870 as well as ACW. It is only available in PDF form though.

    Link to Page https://www.thewargameswebsite.com/forums/topic/new-acw19th-century-rules-feuer-und-furia-francese/#post-7473

    • This reply was modified 6 years, 8 months ago by John.

    To model the effect of Nuclear weapons on the wargaming table, apply jerry can of fuel to board, light match and stand well back.

    John
    Participant

    Very nice. I like the close up shots- they really do compliment your figures and terrain. The scouts already holding tow of the objectives is an interesting idea.

    To model the effect of Nuclear weapons on the wargaming table, apply jerry can of fuel to board, light match and stand well back.

    in reply to: 1859, 1864, 1866 and 1870 #5633
    John
    Participant

    It’s difficult period to write rules for. The ever changing weapons means you can’t simply have a base rules set which covers all. Even Bruce Weigle’s (have I spelt that right?) excellent 1870, 1859 and 1866 rules have to be tweaked to cover it. If you’re looking for corps-level command, which I believe to be the optimum level or playing considering the mass scale of battle that took place, then the 1870 derivative rules are one the best around. At regimental level, the Baccus Commandant De Bataille is probably best for the scale. Otherwise, Fire and Fury variants would probably do the Job.

    Scale wise, I’d stick with the smaller scales (2-15mm), as even just reading the pages on wikipedia show how big the scale is. I have no idea about 10’s and 15’s, but in 6mm Heroic’s and Ros have an adaptable Franco-Prussian and ACW Range, while Baccus has it’s own war-specific range.

    Link to Bruce Weigle’s website 

    • This reply was modified 6 years, 8 months ago by John.

    To model the effect of Nuclear weapons on the wargaming table, apply jerry can of fuel to board, light match and stand well back.

    in reply to: What's on your painting desk/table/corner #5580
    John
    Participant

    Just some odds and ends currently. . . waiting for a delivery of 1/2400 Pre-dreadought fleets to arrive, and to sum up the courage to begin a 10mm Austrian Army.

    1.  10mm Napoleonic Lancers and dragoons- all primed for painting.

    2. 6mm Support elements for a BKCII Panzer Division in 1941- 4 Pak 38 and 3 81mm Mortars done, The Panzerjagers just need basing.

    3. last squad of 15mm Albertine Regulars for AVBCW bolt action.

     

    To model the effect of Nuclear weapons on the wargaming table, apply jerry can of fuel to board, light match and stand well back.

Viewing 23 posts - 1 through 23 (of 23 total)