Forum Replies Created

Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 160 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • Avatar photoRobert Dunlop
    Participant

    You’re welcome.

    A good book on pre-war big exercises in the UK is:

    “Futile exercise? The British Army’s preparations for war 1902-1914” by Simon Batten (ISBN: 978-1-911512-85-1)

    Robert Foley has published an excellent appraisal of the pre-war manoeuvres in Germany under von Schlieffen.

    There are multiple contemporaneous Pathé and similar films as videos online of such manoeuvres in Germany, France, Belgium, and UK.

    I have several books in German and French covering pre-war After Action Reports from manoeuvres.

    Robert

    Avatar photoRobert Dunlop
    Participant

    Thank you for providing the link. A very good piece of work.

    Here are some extra thoughts:

    1. The Russo-Japanese War and the Balkan Wars were monitored by British observers. The information, as well as observations of the German and French military manoeuvres (until the British were stopped from attending) fed into the “recent experiences and observations drawn from the Boer Wars and other colonial conflicts”.

    2. British annual manoeuvres drew on scenarios involving invasion of the UK and similar by major modern enemy forces.

    3. “musketry (the use of rifles)” was very important and involved two major aspects. Marksmanship is the best understood, with individual soldiers receiving financial benefits from achieving high rates of fire associated with accuracy. Less well understood but more important was the training in coordinated fire on a beaten zone. Both aspects of musketry were taught in the French and German armies as well.

    4. Sub-sections were involved in fire and manoeuvre as the distance closed on the enemy to 2-300 metres. Haldane described this in his pre-war training manual for infantry companies. There is at least one Pathé movie of British pre-war manoeuvres that illustrate this approach.

    5. With regards to your point “Cavalry was not considered to be a main threat to organised infantry in good morale”, I think you are referring to cavalry armed with blade and/or lance. Cavalry were also armed with rifles or carbines, which were highly effective against infantry. Cavalry were supported by machine guns too.

    6. You mention about brigading of British MGs, which were normally distributed as 2 per battalion as you noted from your excellent research. Germans operated MG companies (13th Company) but the guns were often parcelled out as two gun teams in practice. The key was assuring mutually supporting lanes of fire, which was best coordinated by the machine gunners as experts in their weapon system. Hence the British and French moving to aggregate MGs into companies outwith the control of infantry commanders and, in the case of the British, into a separate arm – the Machine Guns Corps (my grandfather served in the New Zealand Machine Gun Corps during WW1).

    Robert

    in reply to: 6mm and 10mm WW1 ranges currently being sold? #199457
    Avatar photoRobert Dunlop
    Participant

    Turner Miniatures is a reliable and consistent supplier of 3D files for a wide range of WW1 nations and periods. The figures can be printed at 6 or 10 mm. There are companies that print TM figures for anyone who does not have a 3D printer.

    Robert

    in reply to: Anzac Day – how to commemorate without a fine #197833
    Avatar photoRobert Dunlop
    Participant

    There is a very detailed history of the Maori Pioneer Battalion in the Great War, including involvement in front line operations, written by Christopher Pugsley:

    Robert

    in reply to: Anzac Day – how to commemorate without a fine #197717
    Avatar photoRobert Dunlop
    Participant

    Can’t comment on the issue of the legality but my mother made Anzac biscuits every year. My grandfather was a veteran of the First World War. The biscuits are lovely!

    Robert

    in reply to: The battle or campaign you always wanted to do? #197326
    Avatar photoRobert Dunlop
    Participant

    Not WW2 but we got to reproduce the First Battle of the Marne on the 100th Anniversary in the same region in France. This was the pivotal battle in September 1914 that broke the German advance into France.

    The details of the project can be found here: link

    This is the overhead photo of the final setup in the Dormans’ chapel, with the tables representing more than 50km of battlefield:

    The terrain was accurately reproduced, based on original maps and supported by the use of Hexon terrain pieces for 20 metre contour levels.

    There were more than 10,000 6mm figures deployed. This is a photo of Irregular Miniatures French (from left) and German cavalry about to face off near the town of Courgivaux:

    The public response was amazing. Hundreds of people visited to view the spectacle, including the grandson of a British cavalry officer who took part in the battle. He was in his 80s and was thrilled to be shown where his grandfather had been.

    Robert

    in reply to: Rivers- Tell us About them. #193169
    Avatar photoRobert Dunlop
    Participant

    Total Battle Miniatures has just released a range of flexible river sections of various widths.

    https://www.totalbattleminiatures.com/rivers

    Robert

    in reply to: Rivers- Tell us About them. #191020
    Avatar photoRobert Dunlop
    Participant

    I use the TimeCast latex rivers, FWIIW.

    Robert

    in reply to: Fly-Class Gunboat STL files #190425
    Avatar photoRobert Dunlop
    Participant

    There is a model of the boat without the naval gun and a separate model of the naval gun, so that the gun can rotated however you like.

    Robert

    in reply to: Fly-Class Gunboat STL files #190393
    Avatar photoRobert Dunlop
    Participant

    The model will scale all the way up to 1:300, which is the largest version that I can print.

    Robert

    in reply to: Fly-Class Gunboat STL files #190253
    Avatar photoRobert Dunlop
    Participant

    The model with awnings has been created and uploaded to Thingiverse:

    Robert

    in reply to: 6mm Waterloo 3D prints #189923
    Avatar photoRobert Dunlop
    Participant

    Yes, Andrew. At this level of magnification, you see the features that are made more (or less) prominent compared to ‘real life’. It really helps with painting and, subsequently, with visualising the 6mm figures on table. Once the ten infantry companies are completed then I photograph the whole battalion, which will give a different impression.

    Robert

    in reply to: 6mm Waterloo 3D prints #189899
    Avatar photoRobert Dunlop
    Participant

    Thank you, Skip.

    A British infantry command stand:

    Robert

    in reply to: 6mm Waterloo 3D prints #189779
    Avatar photoRobert Dunlop
    Participant

    French Hussar:

    Robert

    in reply to: 6mm Waterloo 3D prints #189612
    Avatar photoRobert Dunlop
    Participant

    A French Heavy Dragoon:

    Robert

    in reply to: 6mm Waterloo 3D prints #189586
    Avatar photoRobert Dunlop
    Participant

    Thank you, Gary!

    A French Cuirassier:

    Robert

    in reply to: 6mm Waterloo 3D prints #189457
    Avatar photoRobert Dunlop
    Participant

    A British Heavy Dragoon trumpeter:

    Robert

    in reply to: 6mm Waterloo 3D prints #189044
    Avatar photoRobert Dunlop
    Participant

    Thank you, Gary

    This time it is Blücher, also in 6mm:

    Robert

    in reply to: 6mm Waterloo 3D prints #189002
    Avatar photoRobert Dunlop
    Participant

    Here is the Prince of Orange in 6mm:

    Robert

    in reply to: 6mm Waterloo 3D prints #188899
    Avatar photoRobert Dunlop
    Participant

    This is a Prussian Kürassier:

    Robert

    in reply to: 6mm Waterloo 3D prints #188888
    Avatar photoRobert Dunlop
    Participant

    Thank you.

    Here is the Duke of Wellington in 6mm:

    Robert

    in reply to: 3D printed coloured figures #187582
    Avatar photoRobert Dunlop
    Participant

    The new multi-colour 3D printers are extraordinary. But they have a prohibitive price-tag from a gamer perspective. The costs will come down. When the figures and/or printers become truly affordable then it will herald another quantum step forward in 3d printing for sure. ‘Painting’ 3D digital sculpts is a different skill. Block colours are easy but showcase quality ‘painting’ takes more effort and finesse. It is already possible to print high quality colour figures but eventually it will be a case of printing an entire army, pre-based, with unit labels and flags. Roll on the day…

    Robert

    in reply to: British M29 Class Monitor #187138
    Avatar photoRobert Dunlop
    Participant

    Thank you. I have not hollowed the model, no. It would be easy to do so though. There hasn’t been any problem with warping, though it would be easy to fix with warm water if needed.

    Robert

    in reply to: French tank crew small arms #187135
    Avatar photoRobert Dunlop
    Participant

    Tank crews also dismounted Hotchkiss machine guns to provide infantry support when the tank itself was knocked out.

    Robert

    in reply to: British WW1 artillery #185705
    Avatar photoRobert Dunlop
    Participant

    Here is the British 8″ howitzer printed for use with 6mm figures:

    Robert

    in reply to: British WW1 artillery #185459
    Avatar photoRobert Dunlop
    Participant

    Thank you, Steve.

    Here is the British 8″ howitzer on the CAD “drawing board”:

    Robert

    in reply to: Battle of the Somme 1916 #183594
    Avatar photoRobert Dunlop
    Participant

    17th King’s Liverpool Battalion waits for the barrage to lift:

    Robert

    in reply to: Battle of the Somme 1916 #183576
    Avatar photoRobert Dunlop
    Participant

    Another photo taken with the new telephoto lens. This time it is the brick factory (a Leven Miniatures product) near Montauban, with a German regimental HQ in residence (6mm Baccus figures). A Litko marker denotes the use of non-persistent gas shelling on Bernafay Wood:

    Robert

    in reply to: Battle of the Somme 1916 #183559
    Avatar photoRobert Dunlop
    Participant

    Here is Montauban under fire from the French heavy 22cm mortars, part of Group de Menthon attached to British XIII Corps:

    The photo was taken with my new telephoto lens.

    Robert

    in reply to: Battle of the Somme 1916 #183552
    Avatar photoRobert Dunlop
    Participant

    Here is the preparatory bombardment in the Montauban sector:

    The explosion and gas markers are from Litko. The British did shell the German artillery with SK gas shells on 1st July 1916. The markers indicate Caterpillar Valley and Bernafay Wood.

    Robert

    in reply to: Battle of the Somme 1916 #183294
    Avatar photoRobert Dunlop
    Participant

    Thanks.

    WW1 Western Front battles are frequently associated with the perceptions you highlighted. Certainly the 1915 period is full of futile attacks with no gain, due in no small part to the lack of artillery ammunition supplies.

    Later set-piece battles pose a range of tactical challenges that, once understood, offer up meaningful and interesting Wargames, which are not so one-sided. The operational effects of wide frontage attacks are poorly documented in the literature. A little-known effect of the build-up to July 1st 1916 was von Falkenhayn’s refusal to provide reserves to the threatened Somme sectors. The German Second Army was only able to transfer forces within its command. German infantry reserves and artillery were sent north to provide extra protection for Serre and Gommecourt sectors. This set the operational conditions for tactical success of southern British and French attacks, including the attack on Montauban.

    The photo below shows the table set up for the Joy of Six show, commemorating the 100th Anniversary of the Battle of the Somme in 2016. The whole battlefield is 16 feet long:

    Robert

    in reply to: Battle of the Somme 1916 #183273
    Avatar photoRobert Dunlop
    Participant

    Here is a British division- and a corps HQ near the ruins of Carnoy:

    Robert

    in reply to: Battle of the Somme 1916 #183206
    Avatar photoRobert Dunlop
    Participant

    Here is the battlefield, covering the equivalent of an area 4 km x 6 km.

    The British front line is nearest the bottom of the photo. The advance covered the battlefield and reached the furthest German trench line just beyond Montauban with about 5,000 casualties total (out of the two infantry divisions that attacked).

    Robert

    in reply to: Battle of the Somme 1916 #183186
    Avatar photoRobert Dunlop
    Participant

    Thank you very much. The other big benefit is that I can reproduce any historical battle without building specific terrain boards.

    Here is British 89th Brigade forming up at the foot of Montauban ridge, operating on the right wing of the British attack on July 1st 1916:

    Robert

    in reply to: Eyes in the sky #183064
    Avatar photoRobert Dunlop
    Participant

    Other view at table level, showing Caterpillar Valley below the Montauban ridge. The RE8 is still circling:

    Robert

    in reply to: First Battle of the Somme 1918 – AAR #182902
    Avatar photoRobert Dunlop
    Participant

    There are three more pages added, providing additional historical context. First is the IR 140 account of the British tanks:

    https://www.greatwarspearhead.com/battle-reports/first-battle-of-the-somme/infanterie-regiment-nr-140.html

    The war diary entry for 3rd (Light) Tank Battalion:

    https://www.greatwarspearhead.com/battle-reports/first-battle-of-the-somme/3rd-light-tank-battalion.html

    And a German official historical account:

    https://www.greatwarspearhead.com/battle-reports/first-battle-of-the-somme/german-official-history.html

    Robert

    in reply to: First Battle of the Somme 1918 – AAR #182863
    Avatar photoRobert Dunlop
    Participant

    I uploaded some more content, covering the German and 3rd Tank Battalion histories. Steve, you might have hit the server when the upload was in process.

    Robert

    in reply to: First Battle of the Somme 1918 – AAR #182836
    Avatar photoRobert Dunlop
    Participant

    Thank you very much, Konstantinos.

    Robert

    in reply to: First Battle of the Somme 1918 – AAR #182802
    Avatar photoRobert Dunlop
    Participant

    The rolling terrain is based on Kallistra Hexons, matched to the 20m contours on the WW1 topographical trench maps. A heavy felt terrain mat then gradually conforms to the contours, taking away the hexagonal edges and creating a smooth continuous but historical accurate terrain. This really helps in understanding historical battles.

    Robert

    in reply to: First Battle of the Somme 1918 – AAR #182801
    Avatar photoRobert Dunlop
    Participant

    Thank you. The trenches lay in the low ground. Given the fluid nature of the fighting withdrawal, it seemed to be more important to occupy higher ground. It gave better observation and fire control over any advance by the attackers, plus cover and concealment once over the crest if a further withdrawal was needed.

    Robert

Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 160 total)