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  • in reply to: Horizon Wars: Zero Dark – OUT NOW! #133281
    Robey JenkinsRobey Jenkins
    Participant

    Definitely by the end of April!

    in reply to: Zero Dark – Development Blog #132551
    Robey JenkinsRobey Jenkins
    Participant

    The first thing I’d say about EW is, if you’re new to Zero Dark, skip this bit.

    It affects only one type of specialist (the EWOp), so you may prefer to just build X Teams without an EWOp while you get used to the core rules. However, I would encourage you to include them as soon as you feel comfortable – especially in the PvP game – as they open up a realm of combat that is entirely new.

    In the setting, Electronic Warfare Operations (EWOps) have embraced the language of gaming and talk happily about “casing”, “spelldecks”, “familiars” and suchlike. To take the analogy further, there are two broad categories of “spell” that the EWOps can use:

    Buff spells are used on allies to make them better. You can remove nasty conditions, like targeted or impose useful ones, like support tokens or an enhanced firewall. The other thing you can do with a buff is change a friendly robot’s program.

    De-buff spells, meanwhile, are used on opponents to inflict bad conditions or remove useful ones, opposite to the above. They can also be used to change enemy robot’s programs! But de-buff spells also provide the ability to enter the “interference” state.

    Interference represents the EWOp diving into the enemy BattleNet to steal information and mess with their plans. An EWOp in the intererence state can do a range of special actions: attacking enemy EWOps in digital duels, messing with the control deck or hiding one of their allies from being easily perceived by the enemy BattleNet.

    Domination is one of the most fun – but also most tricky – sides of electronic warfare: attempting to wrest control of an enemy synthetic from its own BattleNet. It’s quite a conditional action – and I got the rules wrong myself in one of the recent livestreams! The target has to be in the targeted state with no support tokens, the attempt must be declared in advance as a dominate action and the domination cannot generate bonus actions.

    The idea behind this is that, in PvP games, your opponent is going to notice that you’re trying to dominate his synthetic (just as the BattleNet would notice such an action) and have the chance to stop you. If you want to dominate an enemy synthetic, the first thing you would need to do is make sure the enemy EWOp can’t stop you by, for example, engaging them in a digital duel…

    Dominated characters retain all of their state and upgrades, but now they work for the enemy! Dominated bogeys, meanwhile, get a new statline of their own. It’s not as good a statline as a hero’s going to have, but that reflects how much easier it is to dominate a bogey than a character in an opposing X Team.

    Anyway, I hope you get a sense of the role that EWOps can play in Zero Dark. They really are the spellcasters of the scifi world, using their skills to protect and enhance their allies and to confuse and harrass the enemy.

    I hope to expand on the options for EWOps in future supplements but, for now, I think they are more than adequately complicated, whilst still being a fun and characterful addition to the game.

    in reply to: Zero Dark – Development Blog #132461
    Robey JenkinsRobey Jenkins
    Participant

    Cover art!

    Robey JenkinsRobey Jenkins
    Participant

    Just got it confirmed that I’ll be there running participation games of Zero Dark for anyone who wants to take it for a spin!

    Plan is to do mostly co-op battles through the day.  But if anyone’s interested, we’ll organize a PvP battle from about 1500.

    in reply to: Zero Dark – Development Blog #131733
    Robey JenkinsRobey Jenkins
    Participant

    Thomaston has it correct.  15 points plus 2 bonus points.  Also worth saying that stat has a maximum of 6.

    in reply to: Zero Dark – Development Blog #131715
    Robey JenkinsRobey Jenkins
    Participant

    Marc T has posted a blog about his experience trying out the PvP mode for Zero Dark:

    First game of Zero Dark

    in reply to: Zero Dark – Development Blog #131552
    Robey JenkinsRobey Jenkins
    Participant

    There is an upgrade called “Second” that isn’t a specialism (you only get a maximum one of each specialism).

    Glad to hear you’re getting into the spirit of the game!

     

    in reply to: Zero Dark – Development Blog #131498
    Robey JenkinsRobey Jenkins
    Participant

    <p style=”text-align: left;”>Although, EWOps are mages and Spooks are more like bards.</p>

    in reply to: Zero Dark – Development Blog #131497
    Robey JenkinsRobey Jenkins
    Participant

    Your analysis is pretty much spot-on, John.  The book itself also addresses the other point about leaders in that there are leaders (the one in charge) and Leaders, who are especially gifted in this area.  The specialism refers to those who are thus gifted.  They are probably going to be officers or Senior NCOs with legendary reputations for not only succeeding against the odds but also of bringing back their people alive.

    in reply to: Zero Dark – Development Blog #131309
    Robey JenkinsRobey Jenkins
    Participant

    Synthetic characters are some of my favourite bits of the game.

    The first thing I need to point out, because some patrons pointed out that it wasn’t immediately obvious, is that heroes – your team’s main features – can be synthetic.  In fact, it’s often a good idea to have at least one synthetic character in a team as you’ll see.
    Synthetic heroes come in three flavours:

    Robots are sci-fi staple androids: human- or roughly-human-shaped, independent and a bit stupid or, at least, not as independent as a true intelligence.  They are smart enough to move quickly, fire accurately and to help and support their allies, but they must be given a program that dictates broadly what they do with each action when they are activated.

    Drones are best thought of as robots with human minds.  Their operator is likely to be some way away, but sees what the drone sees and acts accordingly.

    Artificial Intelligences meanwhile are digital superminds that exist on the Battlenet, but which are able to “bodysnatch” other synthetics on the Battlenet to take an active role on the battlefield.

    Let’s look at some of what makes each of them special.

    First of all, all synthetics are “inhuman” – this makes them immune to the feelings of panic that fleshy beings feel when they are shot at and immune to any other effect that causes stress (an effect in the game that causes characters to freeze and have to use actions – and run down the clock – to get back in the game).  The other thing all synthetics have is an immunity to the effect of the heatlight visor.  I’ve not mentioned this upgrade before, but it gives some pretty major advantages to the wearer when shooting at warm-bodied targets – but it doesn’t help at all against synthetics.  In playtesting the PvP game, we found that people do love the heatlight visor, but their faces fell when facing an all-synthetic enemy!
    Then each type of synthetic also gets its own advantages.

    Drones are all Alert – this gives them a 360 degree arc of awareness: literally eyes in the backs of their heads.  Other than that, they really are “one of the team” and are otherwise just like any other hero.

    Robots may have the limitation of their program, but each program confers another upgrade.  For example, the Assassin program confers the Stealthy upgrade.

    Robots also have a special relationship with EWOps (see above for details on EWOps) because one of the things EWOps can do to a robot is change its program.  So if you’ve got a robot with a Medical program but you really need it to go kill that Boss, you can use the EWOp to re-program it to the Assault program.  Of course, this sword cuts both ways. EWOps in the PvP game can hack enemy robots to change their program, too!

    AIs get an upgrade of your choice for free (although they can’t be Leaders, and can’t have weapon upgrades for obvious reasons).  They also have a special relationship with other synthetics, but whilst the EWOp’s is relatively benign, the AI is more of a puppet master.  An AI can possess another synthetic, gaining the possessee’s upgrades (as well as its own) and replacing the possessee’s stats with the AI’s.  This can be a great manoeuvre for objective grabbing or saving a colleague’s life, as a high-F/low-A character can be replaced with a low-F/high-A one with the right skills for the moment.

    When you face enemy synthetics, be it in the PvP or solo/team mode, an EWOp can also dominate enemy synthetics, joining them to their own Battlenet and making them available for a friendly AI to possess them.

    I hope you’ll have seen, just from this short visit to the Battlenet, that synthetics can really mix up your tactical options in a game and provide some tempting choices for a small team.  A popular combination for a 4-person team has been a robot with the Medical program, an AI Spook, a drone EWOp and a human Leader.  But for all that is has some fancy synergies, it’s not an unbeatable combination or a guaranteed win in a solo mission: after all, you have one fewer ally on the table unless the EWOp can dominate an enemy synthetic.  And the robot is basically incapable of claiming objectives, which can put you in trouble if the other side has some good shooting results at the wrong moment.

    In the next blog, having touched upon it in this one, we’ll have a look at Electronic Warfare in more detail and talk about the extra dimension that EWOps bring to the team.

    in reply to: Hidding Mines and IEDs, “Odd Terrains” #130350
    Robey JenkinsRobey Jenkins
    Participant

    Mike’s point at the start I think is a really strong one and reflects real life: if every pile of rubble and box could hide a mine… you don’t touch the piles of rubble and suspicious boxes!

    I think the best solution to this sort of thing is simply random events that emerge naturally from gameplay.  So, for example, if you have a 2d6 system, then a roll of snake eyes might generate a random event.

    I played a game today with a similar system and my brave hero fight through her wounds to reach the objective only for the bloody thing to blow up in her face and nearly kill her!

    in reply to: Zero Dark – Development Blog #130347
    Robey JenkinsRobey Jenkins
    Participant

    Skip to 00:10:30 when I remembe to turn on my microphone.  You don’t miss anything important.

    This is a long one! Follow my attempt to infiltrate enemy territory and secure classified data with my team of heroes. The opening is slightly more relevant, this time (barring my minute away from the screen to fetch a cup of tea).

    R.

    in reply to: Zero Dark – Development Blog #130114
    Robey JenkinsRobey Jenkins
    Participant

    You can back my Patreon for early access, remember!

    https://www.patreon.com/precinctomega

    I’ve just had two great chunks of feedback from a couple of patrons and spent a couple of days making adjustments based on their excellent suggestions.

    Dynamic terrain is a great idea, but one I think I’ll save for when I publish the first campaign book (currently July 2020), as it’s best suited to solo or team missions where the players have 100% control over what they put in and what they leave out.

    You just have to look at my Zero Dark Pinterest art page to see that I also love scifi weapons.  But the moment you start saying “this is a boltgun” or “this is a laser pistol” suddenly you’re limiting people’s choices of miniature and that’s the opposite of what I want to do.  I want people to be inspired by their miniatures collection to create characters that suit them, rather than restricted by the rules to use only minis that suit *my* vision.

    By the way, I also have a Zero Dark Pinterest miniatures page.  Suggestions are welcomed.

    in reply to: Zero Dark – Development Blog #130105
    Robey JenkinsRobey Jenkins
    Participant

    Upgrades make up a large chunk of the rulebook, but I don’t want to spend too long dwelling on them in the design blog. So this will be the last blog talking about them and I’ll cover off the remaining categories:

    Armour is a simple numerical value from 0 to 8 and it has three effects: first, it makes you harder to hit. This is borrowed directly from Horizon Wars and, although it sounds counter-intuitive, I’m sticking with it and I’ll explain why in a moment. Second, it makes you harder to injure. This is more logical, I’m sure you’ll agree.

    To expand on these two points: basic armour – let’s say AV3 – has the equal effect in both directions: it adds +3 to the effective range to the target and you roll 3 dice in the counter-test against the shooting attack. The core rules don’t include anything but basic armour, but the door is open for advanced armour types which may add or subtract from these. So you could have, for example, AV3 chameleon armour that adds +1 to the effective range but subtracts -1 from the counter-test. Or AV3 bulky armour that subtracts -1 from the effective range, but adds +1 to the counter-test.

    Just to emphasize: this is something that will follow the basic rules in the supplements and expansions to the game, but it serves to explain why these two complementary aspects of armour sit alongside each other.

    The third effect of armour is that it makes climbing and jumping harder. This is the reason why all heroes start with AV1, but you can either drop that to AV0 or raise it to AV2 without it counting as an upgrade or otherwise. If you want an agile ninja of a hero, you might want them to be AV0 despite the risks.

    Weapons in Zero Dark are abstract in a similar way to Horizon Wars. I don’t care whether your hero has an M919x gauss rifle or a Beltway-7 laser pistol. All I care about it what it does to a target. So weapon upgrades might be better described as “weapon effects”. Weapons might be lethal, or explosive for example. This leaves players maximum freedom to use miniatures equipped really however they please as long as they can justify the weapons based upon their effects.

    An exception to this is grenades, which I thought were essential to a game like Zero Dark and which come in a broad array of types from simply fragmentation grenades to ones which simply put everyone in its area of effect into the “targeted” state.

    It’s worth noting, though, that Zero Dark doesn’t use templates. I’ve always found the binary predictability of weapon templates to be… unsatisfying. Explosive weapons in Zero Dark are unpredictable and dangerous. With the right (wrong?) dice roll you can potentially blow yourself up with your own weapon, so keep that in mind before you pull the trigger.

    Gadgets are other bits of kit that aren’t weapons: we’ve got your nanoweave invisibility cloaks and your see-in-the-dark visors; we’ve got jump packs and exoskeletons. If there’s an advantage to be pressed, we’ll try to help you press it.

    One of the cool things I’ve tried to build in to gadgets in particular is synergy. That is, there are gadgets that you’ll look at and think “why would I spend an upgrade slot on that?” – and you’d be right. There is at least one gadget – the relay visor – that, on its own, is entirely useless. But in synergy with another character with a relay upgrade, such as a zipper drone, suddenly your EWOp can stay out of trouble’s way whilst lighting up enemy targets like no one’s business!

    That’s just one example. There are a few deliberate synergies built into the gadgets and, I hope, even more accidental ones waiting for players to unlock.

    Last of all, Traits are those subtle qualities that turn someone from merely being a character to being a hero: little tweaks that let them break some rule or do something better than other characters. Most of the traits are self-explanatory – things like courageous and athlete – but there is at least one that will require a design blog all of its own: synthetic.

    So I’ll leave off there and next time we’ll look at synthetic characters, why you would want to take them and what they can do.

    in reply to: Zero Dark – Development Blog #129380
    Robey JenkinsRobey Jenkins
    Participant

    At the encouragement of my patrons (I think they back me just for the fun of making me dance to their tune) I did a livestream demo of a game of Zero Dark.

    Because it was my first YouTube livestream, I started it ten minutes early and rambled to no one whilst trying to make sure everything was working properly, so fast forward to 00:10:12 for the start of the actual demo game.

    R.

    in reply to: Trolling my own self #128663
    Robey JenkinsRobey Jenkins
    Participant

    Actually, fair point.  Within the full spectrum of millions of battles fought in human history, it is definitely the exception rather than the rule, so I stand corrected.

    in reply to: Trolling my own self #128640
    Robey JenkinsRobey Jenkins
    Participant

    I think Geof pretty much nailed it from the off.  Clearly a poor simulation but not necessarily a bad game.

    That said, if one side makes all the right tactical decisions and has good luck and still loses then, yes, bad design.  But in the case in hand, this assumes that the moves of the winning side (historically) also made all the right tactical decisions.

    In historical battles, victory can always turn on a single coincidence that is hard to replicate in a game.  One lucky arrow and the king is dead.  But few, designers would write a game that allowed your centrepiece general model to die that easily and, even if they did, they probably wouldn’t also design a system that then meant the whole army turned tail and fled (you can imagine a cascading morale system, of course, but a good game would make it impossible or, at least, very unlikely that a whole army would flee as a consequence simply because that’s just not any fun).  But in history, sh*t happens.  And whole armies crumbling as word spreads that the top guy is dead… well, that happened a lot.

    in reply to: Zero Dark – Development Blog #128639
    Robey JenkinsRobey Jenkins
    Participant

    In the Zero Dark setting, it’s kind of assumed that your X Team is going to be made up of specialists: serious, military operators who consider the work of entering an area, killing the enemy, securing the objective and extracting to base to be… well, their job. It’s a job they are good at and they understand and accept those risks.

    It should be said that, for those who want to, you can entirely ignore the setting and create your own. The team could just be a rag-tag group of tourists, lost in a Westworld-like robot theme park, or a gang of Jedi younglings trying to escape from Order 66. But for the purposes of this blog, we’ll assume they are the default scifi military operators.

    The nature of a special forces team is that each team member will tend to fill a particular role. Everyone can do everything, but everyone is the best in the team at doing one particular thing. Specialisms represent that particular level of special expertise. As a result, any one hero can have only one specialism.

    The Leader is, obviously enough, the one in charge. But whilst every team has a leader, not every team has a Leader. In this sense, a leader has a level of personal charisma and dedication that inspires the members of the team to out-perform even their own high standards. A leader gets a pool of re-roll dice that, used wisely, can make the difference between victory and defeat. But if the leader goes out of action, unused dice may be lost.

    A Doc isn’t necessarily (or even, perhaps, usually) an actual doctor. A doc has a gift for combat medicine that will often make “proper” medical professionals despair when they see the mess of dressings, random environmental objects and analgesics these guys dispense to keep their team mates on their feet when all good sense should have put them on a stretcher. Docs can re-roll any or all of the dice in medic tests performed on a non-synthetic character.

    An EWOp is an Electronic Warfare Operator, often called a “combat hacker” by the media, although it’s not something you should call them to their faces. EWOps can seriously mess with the enemy game-plan, buffing their friends, de-buffing their opponents and dominating enemy synthetics, turning them into allies. Electronic Warfare opens up a whole new dimension of play.

    Sappers have come a long way from digging trenches by the time of Zero Dark. If EWOps deal with software, these guys deal with hardware. They unlock remotes as allies, carry sentry devices, like mines and sentry guns, and can act like docs when doing medic tests on synthetic characters. If you just need to reliably blow something up, you want a sapper.

    No team likes having to work with Spooks. It’s rarely clear who, exactly, they work for or even if the name they gave was their real one. They have a weird level of insight to enemy plans but only ever seem to be involved when the missions are particularly difficult. Spooks manipulate the Control Deck by removing cards (running down the clock) which they can they put back in to replace any flip result with a preferable one.

    What do you think of Zero Dark‘s selection of specialists? Are there any we haven’t included that you think ought to be in there?

    In the next blog, we’ll look at the remaining categories of upgrades – armour, weapons, gadgets and traits.

    in reply to: Zero Dark – Development Blog #128638
    Robey JenkinsRobey Jenkins
    Participant

    There’s no limit to how many heroes you take in a game of Zero Dark, but I tend to find that 3-5 is the sweet spot. Beyond that, and you’ll find that some heroes just don’t do much because it turns out you don’t need their particular skills, and if you’re playing co-op, there’s a lot of downtime for those who aren’t activating their particular hero. It’s a lot like an RPG. To have a good game, you need an interesting party, but if the party is unwieldy the game tends to get out of hand and it spoils everyone’s fun.

    But even if you only have two or three heroes, you can still get more friendly minis on the table by taking allies.
    Allies are a special sort of upgrade that adds another character to the X Team. “Character” is a generic term for the main players in your drama. Heroes are the leads, but they can still have a supporting cast. You could even have a single hero and a range of supporting characters alongside him or her. There are three options for allies in the starting line up of the game:

    Remotes are synthetic assistants. At their most basic, they are simply an expendable drone that can rush up to objectives and interact with them when it’s too dangerous to send a hero: zipping around that unexpected enemy mech, or clambering over an otherwise-unscalable object. But they can be improved with a number of their own upgrades, including adding weapons to them to create a mobile gun platform.

    Close Protection Dogs are trained to take on an enemy that gets too close to their principle. Great for helping keep smart but weak heroes alive, CP Dogs can also work with the more lethal type of hero to allow them to take on more than one enemy at once!

    Embedded Journalists are both burden and buff for heroes. On the one hand, no one like operating under the scrutiny of the media. But it certainly does help to focus the mind! Heroes who are acting within the line of sight of an emjay get bonuses to their actions, but if the emjay gets killed, that’s very much the definition of “bad news”.

    Allies provide a few things to Zero Dark. The first and, to be honest, most important is the option to put some new and unusual miniatures on the tabletop that you might always have liked but never known what to do with. At its heart, Precinct Omega is about giving you excuses to use the miniatures you love more than the miniatures someone tells you you have to use. But there’s no value in minis that look great but don’t contribute to the game. All the allies are designed to enhance the natural abilities of the heroes: not powerful on their own, but a force multiplier that can make the difference between success and failure at the right moment.
    Next blog (sorry this one was a bit later than planned) will look at some of the other types of upgrade and what they add to your X Team.

    in reply to: Zero Dark – Development Blog #127450
    Robey JenkinsRobey Jenkins
    Participant

    No man is a prophet in his own town, and no game designer can get any bugger to come and play his new game with him, so it’s always hard to know how much anyone really cares until you actually publish the damn thing.  But Patreon campaign is amazing because it gives me an immediate group of people who are already paying for the privilege of staying up to date with work.  It’s very motivating.

    Anyway, for an insight into the mechanics, check out my new video.

    Suffice to say that I am a game designer, not a video director…

    in reply to: Zero Dark – Development Blog #127408
    Robey JenkinsRobey Jenkins
    Participant

    Thanks, Olaf!  It helps to know I’m not crying into the wind.

    R.

    in reply to: Zero Dark – Development Blog #127403
    Robey JenkinsRobey Jenkins
    Participant

    We all love a good heist movie, don’t we? My favourite bit is the early chapter – usually done as a montage or series of short, choppy scenes with a unifying musical track – when the Boss puts his team together. Whether it’s Ocean’s Eleven, Hogan’s Heroes or Justice League, you get this sense of a diverse group of character, each with their own particular strengths and weaknesses, who come together to create something greater than the sum of its parts.

    When I wrote the rules for building your “X Teams” (whether the X stands for Exploration, Extermination or something else is for you to decide) in Zero Dark, I really wanted to capture some of that flavour as well as borrowing from the popular Horizon Wars mechanics for building custom mechs – but with even more creative freedom!

    The baseline is that each hero – the main type of character, the other being allies, who are a bit different – gets 15 stat points to spend on four stats that will look a bit familiar to Horizon Wars players: M, F, A and D. But they mean something a little different in Zero Dark: Mobility, Fight, Acuity and Discipline. The first two are physical stats. The latter two are essentially mental stats.

    Then you can add as many upgrades to each hero as you like!

    What? That makes no sense!

    Mad, right? Well, the thing is, if you’re playing solo or co-op, then you add up all the upgrades you’ve taken on your characters and then you run down the clock by that many cards. So, sure, by all means take a ludicrous bunch of upgrades for a superhuman hero, but you’ll have less time to complete your mission.

    Now, things are slightly balanced in the heroes’ favour, because upgrades are better than the clock. This allows you to balance how hard you want any given mission to be by giving your heroes more upgrades and abilities. It’ll run down the clock, but your advantages will mostly off-set that disadvantage. Mostly.

    In a PvP missions, you must agree with your opponent how many upgrades you get to take on each hero. So there are no limits, but your opponent has the same advantages you do. The default position is 4/16/4, or 4 heroes with a maximum of 16 upgrades, a maximum of four of which are allocated to each hero.

    Makes a bit more sense, now?

    Hmmm… OK, so what are the upgrades?

    There are loads of upgrades, but they split down into five main types: specialisms (of which you can have a maximum of one of each in your team), traits, gadgets, weapons and allies. One of the traits – “synthetic” – also gives you access to things like artificial intelligences, robots and drones.

    They sound really interesting! Tell me more.

    I will. Next week, we’ll talk about allies. If you want to know more about the others, you’ll just have to wait. 😉

    in reply to: Zero Dark – Development Blog #126044
    Robey JenkinsRobey Jenkins
    Participant

    I’ll take that as a positive response given your antipathy to card-based mechanics.

    in reply to: Zero Dark – Development Blog #125900
    Robey JenkinsRobey Jenkins
    Participant

    Copy/paste from a recent blog:

    The Control Deck runs the artificial intelligence behind the Red Force. It’s a normal deck of 54 playing cards. After every character activation, you flip the Control Deck. The result dictates the behaviour of the Red Force.

    The value of the card tells you which bogey will act. The suit tells you what they will do. If you flip a Joker, you get a complication – this can be anything from more bogeys to a booby trap.

    Bogeys come in three basic flavours: Grunts, Elites and Bosses. Grunts are plentiful and die easily, but they can gain support tokens that make them tougher or deadlier. Elites are harder to put down and more dangerous. But most dangerous of all is the Boss. Complications can introduce special bogeys, like the Sniper or the dreaded Defence Mech.

    You can manipulate the Control Deck in a few ways. The most basic is to move cautiously. A cautious move, if successful, negates the primary action on a Control Deck flip. Another way is to take a Spook: a special kind of hero. A Spook gives you a hand of cards from the deck that you can play at any time to replace the actual flip.

    However, the Control Deck also performs a second important role: it is the mission timer. Once you run out of cards the mission is over. If you’ve not finished, you lose. There are lots of things you can do in the game that give you advantages, but which “run down the clock” – that is, they remove cards from the deck, so you have less time to complete your mission.

    in reply to: Zero Dark – Development Blog #125826
    Robey JenkinsRobey Jenkins
    Participant

    John will be pleased to know that an answer to his question will be the first piece of text in the book.  Yes, it comes from Zero Dark Thirty.  When I was in the Army it was called Oh Dark Hundred, but the “Z” was too good to miss (there are more Zs in the future – they’re like typographical hexagons).

    Olaf – yes, a deck of normal playing cards runs the AI system to operate the Red Force.

    R.

    in reply to: Zero Dark – Development Blog #125778
    Robey JenkinsRobey Jenkins
    Participant

    Just like HW, weapons will be defined by their properties, rather than their names.  So a character has a Fight stat that broadly describes their shootiness, then you can make them Lethal, or Suppressed, or Explosive or whatever combo you want to recreate the particular weapon you have in mind.  Grenades are dealt with separately.

    in reply to: Scared off gaming #118926
    Robey JenkinsRobey Jenkins
    Participant

    [quote]Do you want them on TWW?

    Not especially, more sympathy and support for the affected family[/quote]

    /endthread

    Robey JenkinsRobey Jenkins
    Participant

    Hi, yeah, the forums never really took off, despite the number of people insisting they wanted to use them rather than FB.  I never bothered to migrate them to the new website.  Might dig them out again some time…

    This website, though, is cool as hell.  I will tell people about this thing!

    R.

    • This reply was modified 8 months, 3 weeks ago by Robey JenkinsRobey Jenkins.
    Robey JenkinsRobey Jenkins
    Participant

    lot better than Dettol.

    Robey JenkinsRobey Jenkins
    Participant

    Hi, Mike.  Sorry to have neglected TWW for so long, but I’m back and trying to be a constructive, contributory member (trying to work out if I can afford to be a sponsoring member, too…).

    Yes, these miniatures were originally released by Macrocosm with a Kickstarter in 2016, but Chris got distracted by other things (see Boneyards for more details) and so I nipped into his shed while he was out and made off with the moulds*.

    I now have almost the whole available range upon my website:

    Team of one-eyes:

    One-eyes Team

    Team of two-eyes:

    Two-eyes Team

    Limited Release Halloween Balls:

    Halloween Balls

    I’m going to try to get some gameplay videos up on YouTube ASAP.

    *No, not really.

    Robey JenkinsRobey Jenkins
    Participant
    If anyone is interested in miniatures options for Zero Dark, check out my Pinterest collection accordingly:
    in reply to: Sci Fi Fighters – Why? #64225
    Robey JenkinsRobey Jenkins
    Participant

    I tend to feel that space fighters are conditional upon the nature of your hypothetical technology.  For example, assuming that FTL travel is possible, some people assume that fighters won’t have it and therefore need carriers.  But as the nature of FTL travel is utterly hypothetical, there’s no reason to assume that fighters (like X-Wings) wouldn’t be as capable of FTL travel as their larger siblings.  Moreover, there tends to be an assumption that FTL travel will be analogous to STL travel, requiring fuel and involving straight-line conventional motion.  But current thinking on FTL is closer to the Alcubierre concept in which travel involves a shift in the ship’s relationship with space/time, or with the Frank Herbert idea of instantaneous movement from Point A to Point B.  In either case, neither fuel nor manoeuvrability (Delta-V) is a factor in play – just the presence of the right piece of technology.

    If we assume NO FTL then fighters become even more important.  If you have a generation ship, it can’t afford to change velocity or vector.  That was planned and calculated hundreds or even thousands of years ago.  The ship may not even possess the ability to change its direction or velocity.  So smaller ships that can provide close support and scouting capabilities are essential.

    In either case, the resort to a remote operator still has to assume a certain level of proximity that, in space, can’t be assumed.  Unless we’re going for quantum entanglement, any kind of remote link will suffer relativistic effects at the sort of operator distances seen in space that will begin to affect reaction times, whilst a manned ship will never suffer from that problem.  In a related point, once you have remote-operated fighters, you also reach the point at which you have remote-operated squadrons: one human “commander” overseeing multiple fighters with on-board AI.  This has the same problem as before, complicated by a divided attention span, multiplied by the assumption (inevitably erroneous) that the AI can deal with instant problems.

    Finally, there’s one more important argument in favour of space fighters.

    Humans are stupid.

    By which I mean: humans have a natural tendency to do things that obviously aren’t in their best interests.  Scuba diving, horse riding, bungie jumping, BASE jumping, parkour, subway surfing…  We are a species of thrill-seekers (especially between the ages of 15 and 27).  So even in the absence of a formal military space fighter command, it is logical to assume the potential for a mercenary contingent of human space fighter pilots who are doing it for the yuks.

    Robey JenkinsRobey Jenkins
    Participant

    A new battle report is up, with more photos and a lot of mechanical explanation as we go:

    The Heist! – A Zero Dark Battle Report

    Robey JenkinsRobey Jenkins
    Participant
    I was really hoping to have the final alpha test version finished and ready to share this weekend gone.  Unfortunately a major family crisis has slowed progress down, somewhat.  However, I’ve put up a stop-gap update because a number of important changes and additions have been developed and as I’ve got a contingent of new alpha-testers joining, I thought they deserved the latest gen.
    Important changes
    Well, first of all I’ve split “characters” into “heroes” and “allies”.  I nearly went with “extras”, but that was too close to 7TV (which is great, btw!) for comfort and not completely accurate, either.  Heroes are your principle actors.  They are the ones you customize and build.  Allies, meanwhile, have fixed stats and abilities.  At the moment, there’s a fairly narrow range of options for allies, but I see it being built on to add theme to campaigns and special missions.  We have remotes and emjays (embedded journalists) with rules, plus dogs.  I’m in two minds about retaining dogs.  They don’t really fit with my bespoke setting, but they feature a lot in my sources of inspiration.  Suggestions for more allies are welcomed.
    I’m really pleased with the emjays.  They are allies and you have to activate them like any character, but they can’t complete objectives.  Why on Earth would you include them at all?  Well, they work as a buff unit.  If the active character makes a test within an emjay’s LOS, the character gets a re-roll – this is supposed to represent the character trying harder because he or she is being filmed, plus the tendency of the emjay to film whatever’s most interesting/important at any given moment.  There will be more rules that involve emjays in campaign rules and missions involving civpop.
    I’ve also fine-tuned the Control Deck (formerly known as the AI deck, but I binned that to avoid confusion with AI characters!).  No iteration of the Control Deck hasn’t worked, but they haven’t all worked how I wanted them to.  The latest version has the Red Force moving around somewhat, but not too much, whilst equipping them with support tokens to make them more threatening, but not with too many!
    Get the latest rules here:
    Robey JenkinsRobey Jenkins
    Participant
    A new battle report for Zero Dark, with photos and some mechanical explanation along the way:
    Robey JenkinsRobey Jenkins
    Participant
    The latest update to the alpha-test version – 0.2.4 – is up for download via the PO Beta-Testing Forum (yes, you have to register #sorrynotsorry).  Latest updates include:
    1. Negative tests are gone.  Feedback from playtesting was a mix of dislike and confusion and it had some pretty swingy outcomes.  They been replaced by counter-tests which will be familiar to anyone who’s played Horizon Wars as they are directly inspired by the Defence roll in that game.  Counter-tests differ from the Defence roll in that they also get critical success outcomes.  This should serve to barricade against the swingy results of negative tests.
    2. Upgrades have introduced the Spook, amended the Leader slightly and clarified that synthetics are immune to stress.
    3. Speaking of stress, that got a bit of an overhaul.  Grit is gone (should have gone last update!) and now replaced with stress.  Stress can make a character under- or over-perform.  Suffering stressful experiences while you’re clear-headed and unwounded is likely to mean over-performing.  Suffering it whilst already stressed and/or wounded will have the opposite effect.  Really pleased with the stress testing of the, er, stess test.
    There’s still some work to do on the alpha-test edition, but it’s looking like a really solid, interesting game for solo, co-op and PvP play.
    An unexpected outcome from the solo play is… it’s really quiet playing a miniatures game on your own.  I was slightly freaked out by the experience, only ever having played solo card games before.  I recommend playing solo with a suitably cyberpunk soundtrack and possible talking out loud a lot.
    Now I have to get back to doing some Ragnarok hobbying and get that game finished, illustrated and published.
    R.
    Robey JenkinsRobey Jenkins
    Participant
    The alpha test rules are updated here:
    Yes, you’ll need to sign up to my forum to download them.  But, if you’re on the fence about that idea, let me tell you a little about what’s in the updates.
    First, in the core rules update there are the new rules for Electronic Warfare!  Hack your enemy’s equipment and dominate their synthetics.  This is especially useful when a Defence Mech turns up behind you!  Buff your allies with better fire data or save them from enemy hacks.
    Second, the Red Force rules have been updated.  Now the Red Force, too, can have its own synthetics.  Invisible to infrared visors, but vulnerable to being dominated: turn the enemy’s synthetics against them and draw them off while you dash for the objective!
    Finally, some minor tweaking on the Upgrades, too.  Indiscriminate weapons are super-effective.  But now you only get one use per upgrade, so choose your moment… wisely.
    Want to know more?  Sign up for the Precinct Omega beta testing forum (it’s free) and download your own copies.
    R.
    in reply to: Victorian nutjobs #59613
    Robey JenkinsRobey Jenkins
    Participant

    Perhaps we could re-think this thread as “Famous and Infamous 19th Century Eccentrics”?

    No doubt future generations will look back upon our own treatment of mental health disorders with horror and amazement, but historically-speaking many great achievements and horrific acts have emerged primarily from the damaged or distorted psyches of powerful men (and even a few women, although in the 19th century, it was, mostly, men).

    Gordon is one example, but we could equally look at Brunel or Richard Burton or Cecil Rhodes or Rudyard Kipling or James Stephenson.  Hm.  The military and engineering seem to dominate.  Are there other fields of Victorian enterprise that deserve some attention?  Ooh, Stanley and Livingstone!

    R.

    Robey JenkinsRobey Jenkins
    Participant

    There are a fair few I re-pinned from the Wargames Website, to be fair.  But yet, Pinterest is a bit like TVTropes in that respect.  Just one click is never enough!  😀

    in reply to: Tomorrow's War run through? #59531
    Robey JenkinsRobey Jenkins
    Participant

    I know this is an old thread, but although Craig is dead right that the rulebook is extremely hard to find your way around, I have to say that TW is worth persevering with, even though it’s probably the sort of game that you’re going to have to learn by being taught, and then use the rulebook as a reference.  I think AAG were somewhat let down by being Osprey’s first “proper” rules-set and both sides were still finding their way with design.  Given how much all parties have learned as a result, a second edition would be a wonderful thing to see, but I fear bridges have been burnt and Osprey is in pursuit of the cult of the new for their sales.

    With all that in mind, I’ve been slowly building up to doing a video tutorial on how to play Tomorrow’s War.  If I can achieve a peace treaty with my recalcitrant video camera, it might even happen sooner rather than later…

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