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  • in reply to: Ral Partha Eagle Knights, circa 1986 #176355
    Mark Morin
    Participant

    Classic! I admire your drive to completeness. Oddly enough, I faced some Ral Partha Carthaginians from the same era last Sunday. It was interesting to compare them to the modern style. Smaller, of course, but more proportional. Less exaggerated details, but they’re definitely charming and still quite usable. My goodness – it just occurred to me that you must be near the end of your lead mountain, if you’re down into the ’80s strata!

     

    Thank you Tony.  This group of Ral Partha figs was the last group left from a large eBay purchase several years ago.  I liked the Eagle Warriors/Knights better than my Tin Soldier UK ones, so I had held onto them and wanted to eventually paint them as I did.  I do prefer the less exaggerated and more anatomically correct figs versus “hero scale”.  I also find they *these 25mm) do ok with 28mm on the tabletop.

    My lead mountain still has several strata!

    in reply to: My HUZZAH! 2022 Recap #175233
    Mark Morin
    Participant

    Thanks Chris and Steve!

    Mark Morin
    Participant

    Mark’s stuff looks grand, it’s a pleasure to see.

    Appreciate that from someone who loves the era

    Mark Morin
    Participant

    very impressive 🙂

    Thanks!

    in reply to: Brigantines for Hernan Cortes #174525
    Mark Morin
    Participant

    Very nice.

     

    Thanks!

    in reply to: Rules for Aztec / Maya / Incan warfare #174413
    Mark Morin
    Participant

    Try Feudal Patrol with the Civilizations Collide supplement from Sally4th

    in reply to: Why the Aztecs lost #174179
    Mark Morin
    Participant

    If the Battle of Otumba had gone differently, or really if Cortes (with an s not a z btw!) had been dispatched on any innumerable opportunities then perhaps the Aztecs may have endured for a time. However, when you wage incessant warfare on your neighbors and take up to 20,000 of them for sacrifice annually year upon year, or just show up annually to also take their food, you’re going to have enemies. Lots of them. All they needed was a way to combine forces and the Spanish arrival did just that. Montezuma was in the end a prisoner not just of the Spanish but of his religious beliefs that saw the Spanish as the beginning of the apocalypse – one that ostensibly all those human sacrifices were supposed to stave off by satisfying Huitzilopochtli. Thus, his actions towards the Spanish were more of resignation to the concept that he was at the “end of times”, which was ironically true for his empire. His tries at treachery were at best half-hearted and incapable of being executed – but they did exist. Interestingly, I have not seen information that smallpox ravaged the Tlaxcalans to the degree it did the Aztecs. One would think it did, as the Tlaxcalans and others made up the vast bulk of Cortes’ forces. The one factor that to me made all the difference was Hernan Cortes himself and his ability to cajole and manipulate his opponents (and allies) as well as meet them in battle. If he had been rolling dice the results he got would have been considered waaaay outside the bell curve. Nice informative post.

    in reply to: My Aztec games at HAVOC 2022 #174121
    Mark Morin
    Participant

    Great looking games there Mark and congrats on another ‘Al’ award! You certainly have been busy since retiring and I know that feeling. How did we ever find time for work;)?

    Thanks Steve – yes work was less busy!  Appreciate the kind words!

    in reply to: My Aztec games at HAVOC 2022 #174120
    Mark Morin
    Participant

    You’ve been keeping quite busy! Looks like your games were well liked, except maybe for Cortez in the last one.

    Yes, Cortes was not lucky that game!

    in reply to: Some thoughts about gaming Aztec Warfare #174080
    Mark Morin
    Participant

    You can check out my Aztec supplement at Sally4th – it’s free to download

    in reply to: What a Tanker May June 1940 game #169983
    Mark Morin
    Participant

    So, effectively a minefield will damage a vehicle in the game only 16.7% of the time, and even then, it’s temporary damage.

    Crikey. That doesn’t sound much like real minefields to me. When I was taught this stuff in the 1970s/80s the British Army’s standard for protective or tactical minefields was 70% field stopping power. I doubt that WW2 standards were much different. And I cannot understand how a minefield can produce “temporary” damage unless the timescale of the game encompasses vehicle recovery. Come to think of it, I don’t think I’ve ever seen any wargame that gives recovery vehicles something to do. All the best, John.

    As a former US Army Combat Engineer officer, I agree.  However a few points.

    First, in 1940 on the Meuse French mines were in poor supply indeed, and hardly deployed.  According to BG Doughty from his book The Breaking Point, Sedan and the Fall of France 1940, the key area where the 1st Panzer Division broke through had virtually no mines: ”  Out of a theoretical allocation of 6,722 mines the 55th Division received only 422 antitank mines.  By the time the meager numbers were allocated to battalions, they received virtually no mines.  For example, the 2/331st Infantry…put in a minefield in its sector…but it had only 19 mines.    Since most of the tanks of the 1st Panzer Division crossed through this area on 13-14 May, even the smallest increase in numbers may have Made an important difference…Though the French military leaders planned on issuing mines to the cavalry forces entering Belgium, they did not pay significant attention to the question of antitank mines, particularly to the employment of antitank mines in the main battle area.  Despite numerous analyses of antitank operations, they placed the greatest emphasis on antitank weapons and on use of natural obstacles (such as rivers) to the front of French units, rather on the use of antitank mines.  Little or no thought was apparently given to using mines in the main battle area or to laying minefields in front of an enemy penetration.  This myopia caused the French to overlook an inexpensive weapon that could have yielded important results in May 1940.”

    Secondly, when any mines at all were laid on roads, they were surface lain, and easily seen or avoided.

    Lastly, in the game for 1940 the minefield rules make sense.  I would argue that in later war the rate and degree of damage should be adjusted if minefields are used in the game.

    WaT is not a true simulation of course, it’s a game.  Damage to tanks takes the form of temporary or permanent damage.  Each point of damage reduces the effectiveness of a tank to act on its turn.  A player can try to repair temporary damage, but not that which is permanent.  There are no recovery vehicles, just the concept of repair as allowed by a dice roll – a roll of a 6 among Command Dice (all players start with 6 and damage removes a die per point) allows a player to repair one point of temporary damage.

     

    Mark Morin
    Participant

    Great looking set-ups, lovely figures, obviously enjoyable games and a well deserved success with the painted figures in the competition!

    Thanks Mike, glad you liked it.

    Mark Morin
    Participant

    Impressive, and unique. No wonder everyone took photos. Congratulations on your painting win. You’re like a Duke Seigfried triple threat – figures, terrain, and even the rules!

     

    You honor me sir!

    in reply to: What a Tanker May June 1940 game #169909
    Mark Morin
    Participant

    Corking stuff, I expect the players had a fine time. I like the “tank bucks” idea for developing the situation from an initial recce.

    You say that minefields are “rarely effective due to the What a Tanker rules” — could you briefly describe what it is in the rules that make them ineffective?

    All the best,

    John.

    Thanks John, As to your question, in WaT (page 29) minefields section states: “You may chooses to designate a minefield as part of your terrain. Tanks may move through a minefield but will lose one Command Dice to temporary damage for any double that is rolled for forward movement, or any 6 rolled if in when reversing.”

    So, effectively a minefield will damage a vehicle in the game only 16.7% of the time, and even then, it’s temporary damage.

    in reply to: Aztec Pyramid and more for Tenochtitlan #169631
    Mark Morin
    Participant

    Agree with all the above – more incredible work. Thank you for sharing!

     

    Glad you like the post!

    in reply to: Aztec Pyramid and more for Tenochtitlan #169630
    Mark Morin
    Participant

    A truly spectacular layout, Mark! I love the colour scheme. Looking forward to the reports on the games.

     

    Appreciate that and I hope to post on them this week.

    in reply to: Aztec Pyramid and more for Tenochtitlan #169629
    Mark Morin
    Participant

    Super Dan, hope it helps, and thanks.

    in reply to: Aztec Pyramid and more for Tenochtitlan #169628
    Mark Morin
    Participant

    Thanks 6mm

    in reply to: Aztec War Canoes #169349
    Mark Morin
    Participant

    Thanks and I’d love to have some nice mangrove terrain!  These were 3D printed by a friend.

    Mark Morin
    Participant

    More superb additions to your collection! I especially like how Alvarado turned out. “Sunny” Alvarado, with his distinctive red hair, is definitely one of the more interesting conquistadors. Hugely popular with his fellow Spaniards (supposedly he was genial, kind and generous to a fault with his comrades in arms), he was at the same time a ruthless monster to the native peoples unlucky enough to meet with him. Few mourned his passing (crushed by his own falling horse, if I remember correctly). A man of contrasts, to be sure, as you point out in your excellent blog post. Looking forward to seeing pics of the game when it finally happens!

    Much thanks!

    in reply to: Aztec War Canoes #167558
    Mark Morin
    Participant

    Hi Mark, Nice to see you continuing with your Tenochtitlan build. While I can’t say this with much historical accuracy, but I really like the flat bottom barges as the canoes. The canoes were primarily used for gardening the chinampas, and the wider design would work better for hauling equipment and produce. Plus Lake Texcoco was pretty flat and calm, so a flat bottomed boat would be fine. And your figures fit nicely onto these canoes! Lovely work as usual. Ralph (Bowman)

     

    Nice to hear that Ralph, thank you.  The flat design did ok, I did just need enough space for my 1″ bases (which drove the size mind you).  I’m sure that the freeboard on these would have been low to the water as well.  More Spanish Conquest stiff shortly…

    in reply to: Aztec War Canoes #167557
    Mark Morin
    Participant

    Very cool and they look good!!

    Thanks kyote

    in reply to: Aztec Serpent Statues #167152
    Mark Morin
    Participant

    Very impressive But I’m also impressed by the box you keep the buildings in as well 🙂

    Nice of you to write Jim, thanks. As for the box, I can’t spend all that time building something for a convention only to have it get chipped along the way. Plus, It allows my wife not to really know how much stuff I really have. If I die first, she will have an easier time bringing it all to the dumpster – or so she threatens!

    We’ll have to organise a rescue expedition 🙂

    Maybe this is appropriate for the minis…https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uu3FRRXqazw

    in reply to: Aztec Serpent Statues #167150
    Mark Morin
    Participant

    Absolutely stunning brush work. Really please that you included a list of paints, I thought the sewer wash, was truly a secret weapon. The kind of wash made with dirty paint water from the wash out jar, not a brand of paints. Happy that’s cleared up. Thank you for sharing.

    Thanks Ian.  Sewer Wash was a Secret Weapon Washes product that I bought a few bottles of back in 2015 and 2016.  I was looking at their website and I think it’s discontinued, though I do see that they have a green/black that looks similar but I’m not sure that it’s the same.  From time to time I review my paint spreadsheet and see what’s getting a bit long in the tooth – and I thought it would be a good idea to use the Sewer Water.  It did have a nice coverage, and stood up to dry brushing well.  Glad you enjoyed the post!

    in reply to: Aztec Serpent Statues #167149
    Mark Morin
    Participant

    Very impressive But I’m also impressed by the box you keep the buildings in as well 🙂

    Nice of you to write Jim, thanks.  As for the box, I can’t spend all that time building something for a convention only to have it get chipped along the way.  Plus, It allows my wife not to really know how much stuff I really have.  If I die first, she will have an easier time bringing it all to the dumpster – or so she threatens!

    in reply to: Aztec Serpent Statues #167148
    Mark Morin
    Participant

    Breathtaking work. Truly.

    Thanks GF!

    in reply to: Aztec War Canoes #167025
    Mark Morin
    Participant

    That’s spooky – I was watching a program on Aztec medicine a couple of hours ago and one of the background pictures showed the lakes with in it! I did wonder about rafts or canoes and lo, your project shows me the answer. The flotilla shots show how frightening this must have been. Your project goes from strength to strength.

    Nothing like an (up to 1521) impregnable island fortress surrounded by a lush lake connecting you to your own cities, conquered cities, and enemies you want to extort annually for wealth, resources, and people for slavery and/or sacrifice to create a huge empire.  I was struck that I had not seen any 28mm miniature battle recreations of a lot of the ones of the Spanish Conquest, especially with war canoes – so, here I go!  Appreciate your following my progress greatly.

    in reply to: Aztec War Canoes #167023
    Mark Morin
    Participant

    very impressive 🙂

     

    Thanks Jim!

    in reply to: Aztec War Canoes #167022
    Mark Morin
    Participant

    Very cool and they look good!!

    Gracias!

    in reply to: Aztec War Canoes #167001
    Mark Morin
    Participant

    Those look great, Mark. The 3d-model striations really do impart a carved wood texture to them. Can’t wait to see the brigantines. Long, long ago in college I did a paper on Cortes’ use of the vessels at Tenochtitlan. At the time (and that was 40 years ago!), not much was known as to what form the Spanish boats would have actually taken. I’m sure more research has taken place since then so it will be interesting to see what you uncover. –jeff

    Thanks Jeff – the challenge was that some striations are bad while others are good .  As for the brigantines, they are coming and are up in priority this year.  I’ll probably have to make some reasonable assumptions (as I have with the rules in the supplement that was updated on Sally 4th (if you want to check it out).

    in reply to: Old School Ral Partha and Minifig Vikings #165626
    Mark Morin
    Participant

    25mm Minifigs were sold as single figures in the UK, and the ‘Ancients’ (including the Vikings) were based on the drawings in the WRG Armies and Enemies books. I bought a couple of hundred in 1980. Sadly all I have left is a unit of beserkers and some cavalry. The cavalry are Rus IIRC. They’re in the loft I think. If anybody wants to see pics I can have a look I suppose 🙂 T

     

    Thanks – my guess was they were from 1980 or so (the Minifigs)

    in reply to: Old School Ral Partha and Minifig Vikings #165625
    Mark Morin
    Participant

    That’s a blast from the past Mark and I have some 1970’s Ral Partha figures somewhere in the attic that I’m too attached to to get rid of, even though they haven’t been used since the early 1980’s!

    I’m just happy they are off to a good home (as long as the  US Mail doesn’t crush them)

    in reply to: Hernan Cortes #165602
    Mark Morin
    Participant

    Growing up a few decades ago on the opposite end of the Caribbean (P.R.*), far from Mexico, we were raised to view the Conquistadores as heroes who ended the constant flow of human sacrifices in Meso-America. It’s one thing to slaughter combatants in battle, and another to slaughter unarmed and defenseless bound captives. The Europeans did so on occasion, for sure, but the Meso-Americans had a virtual conveyor belt of them to their bloody altars, with massive bloodletting events on key religious feast days. At least the Spaniards didn’t eat human flesh. That said, I love your beautifully painted figures! Dan * Where hardly any of the native population survived the culture clash and the exchange of germs

     

    Thanks Dan – I am happy that you are discussing this.  I always preface my games saying “there are no good guys here”, but certainly the Aztecs were brought down as much by Tlaxcalan and Totonac allies who were treated as resources to be exploited.  The Spanish were not angels here, but to your conveyor belt point, they were not that way.  Of course, one must consider the effects of smallpox, typhus, and slavery.  I say its history – and important to learn about.  Appreciate the kind words too on the figs.

    in reply to: Historicon 2021 and more #164934
    Mark Morin
    Participant

    Wonderful write-up, Mark. Was that the first time your setup has been used at a con?

     

    Thanks – yes, I play tested it at home but this was the first con for this game (Cortes Escape Attempt).

    in reply to: Catholic Priests for the Conquistadores #164528
    Mark Morin
    Participant

    Great job Mark – I always find painting the colourful extras much more fun than the actual painting of the army. You mention that you use gorilla glue to help the paint adhere? But you primed everything – figure and base – later. Do you find your primer comes off the washers and that Gorilla Glue fixes that? I never really thought about it, but it seems odd that paint would adhere to a smooth, shiny glue. I’m not arguing with you as you’ve actually tried it. Wonder why?

    I guess it works because the steel washers are already smooth and when I apply the glue I make a random pattern that is essentially less smooth.  It also seals the washer – and later applications have a better foundation to bind to.  I have seen primer come off the edges before.

    in reply to: Catholic Priests for the Conquistadores #164527
    Mark Morin
    Participant

    Very slick. I’ve been reading the 3rd and 4th of the Hyperion scifi series, which features a spacegoing Catholic church centuries in the future, and it’s making me want to get some priests for my 28mm scifi, too.

    Cool Nathaniel, would love to see what you come up with for that!

    in reply to: Catholic Priests for the Conquistadores #164526
    Mark Morin
    Participant

    Very nice Mark and I too like CCP1 the best.

    Thanks Steve

    in reply to: Hernan Cortes #164495
    Mark Morin
    Participant

    And sorry Mark, I didn’t mean to distract from your excellent project and brushwork!

     

    Thanks again – and discussion is good.  My take is that when it comes to sacrifice, slavery, massacre, etc. all parties in this era were certainly not free of guilt.  It’s history – and that’s what must be understood as context.  How these events happened and why is important – as we are the same species as 1518-1521 still.

    in reply to: The Mayans meet the Spanish #164493
    Mark Morin
    Participant

    Thanks.  When my updated stuff gets published I’ll let you know (rules and scenarios).  Of course I need to get through this weekend’s gaming (traveling) and then more painting.  Maya, Inca, brigantines, war canoes, oh my!

    in reply to: Hernan Cortes #164470
    Mark Morin
    Participant

    The truth is he was actually one of the more humane of the big name conquistadors (keeping in mind what the word means, obviously); he could be absolutely ruthless if you got in his way or he felt you were messing with him, but those two things aside, he would often work to protect the Indians from the depredations of his more ruthless countrymen. No doubt this was of small comfort to the Indians themselves, who had lost an empire, their freedom, much of their culture and wealth and all the rest, but it’s worth remembering things could have been much worse. The poor Inca had to deal with a series of psychopaths.

    I imagine the former inhabitants of Cholula may have disagreed with this view, had he not massacred them and handed the survivors over to their enemies as slaves and sacrifices?

    Like I said, it was a brutal era all around.

Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 120 total)