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  • in reply to: WW1 naval. Beginners questions! #200543
    Avatar photoTony S
    Participant

    I have fleets in 1/2400 from Tumbling Dice.  Reasonably priced and I’m quite happy with them.  They’ve got a fairly extensive range

    Here’s a photo of an Austrian battleship.  It’s about 2 1/2 inches long.

    Avatar photoTony S
    Participant

    For translating various foreign language books into English, how does Google Lens do for the more esoteric military terms?  Even if it isn’t perfect, I must confess I would find that much easier than learning another language – or alphabet – and laboriously translating with a dictionary in my lap.

    in reply to: Splitting the squad/section in practice? #200006
    Avatar photoTony S
    Participant

    It’s my understanding that according to the 1944 British infantry training manual, it was SOP to do when the enemy was contacted, to split into the Bren gun team and assault team (rifles) and maneuver seperately.

    Here’s a good article about it.

    The Rifle Section: Backbone of the British Infantry

     

    Avatar photoTony S
    Participant

    Excellent news!  Can’t wait for my copy to arrive!

    in reply to: O Group learning exercise/campaign #199662
    Avatar photoTony S
    Participant

    Beautiful terrain.  We’ve been playing O Group (like yourself, getting rules horribly wrong) using our 15mm collections, but I’ve been pushing to switch to 6mm.  In my humble opinion, the ranges and terrain look more appropriate in that scale.

    I just send the photo in your first report, of the 88 on the hill, firing at the Shermans in the lane to my friend.  That’s exactly why 6mm should be used!

    in reply to: 15mm and 18mm ranges? #199564
    Avatar photoTony S
    Participant

    Lancashire.  They are truly 18mm, and a trifle brittle.  That said, you simply cannot beat the price, especially the unit packs and even more so when he’s having a sale.

    The 18mm Austrians tower over my 15mm Peter Pig Russians, aren’t quite as nicely sculpted, but they were half to a third of the price.  Once they are painted up, they look ok, and on the table, the size difference isn’t perceptible.

    I definitely would not ever mix Lancashire and PP in the same army though!

    in reply to: Tricorn & Bonnet: First Look (Prestonpans) #199174
    Avatar photoTony S
    Participant

    Very interesting and I appreciate not only the quick overview, but the fact that you actually played a game.  To be totally honest, I’m not terribly interested in the Jacobite Rebellion, but I am given to understand that these rules are at least the early foundation for his next set, which aim to focus on Prince Eugene and his conflicts with the Ottomans.  That, to me, sounds more interesting, an entirely subjective opinion to be sure.

    I rather like the tight focus that Graham’s rules display, as well as the fact that he tends to also find rather obscure wars to write rules about!

    in reply to: This week in gaming #199058
    Avatar photoTony S
    Participant

    I was going to play O Group on Sunday, but my opponent had to send his regrets and cancel.  I quickly arranged a Lion Rampant game, pushing it slightly backwards into the Punic Wars with another friend who also was bereft of a game.

    I don’t remember ever being so comprehensively beaten.  The Romans didn’t lose a single unit.  I, on the other hand, lost everyone.  Perhaps I had a spot of bad luck here and there, but if so, that was greatly magnified by a number of spectacularly poor decisions on my part.

    Despite not having a worthy adversary, my opponent had a good time, as he pulled out some old, old figures that he last used for WRG 5th edition games.  It’s been about forty years since they last saw action he estimated.

    in reply to: Deth Wizards #199011
    Avatar photoTony S
    Participant

    I enjoyed Space Station Zero, but never got MJ13. Been hemming and hawing about it.

    If you don’t mind, what didn’t you like about it?  I’m guessing it’s not a reskinned version of SSZ?

    Deth Wizards does look more interesting to me though.

    in reply to: Last historical period you started? #198741
    Avatar photoTony S
    Participant

    Well, I had intended to start on a 15mm Napoleonic Saxon contingent to fight with the French at Wagram, and against them in 1807, enough to play decent games in Soldiers of Napoleon, LaSalle or Glory is Fleeting.

    But the a few of us at the Club have decided to embark on a campaign (very simple, so we actually stand a chance of finishing it) set in the mid to late 400s.  Late Romans versus Late Romans (“I’m the Emperor, and so’s my wife”) versus various rude hairy types.  As Victrix just came out with their new Dark Ages boxes of Saxons, I figured I’d switch from Saxons in bicornes to Saxons in spangenhelm.

    Avatar photoTony S
    Participant

    As ever, your club puts on some stunningly attractive games.  Thanks for sharing.

    The various Rampant rules are excellent for club nights, aren’t they?

    in reply to: Model Prep #198338
    Avatar photoTony S
    Participant

     if I spot more bits that attention,

    If?  

    You’re a better man than I.  While I’m the middle of printing the figure, I’m always spotting bits or flash I missed when prepping for priming.  Put down the brush, pick up a knife, carve off the flash, grab another brush, slop on some white – not primer, but it’s better than painting over bare metal and then resume regular operations.

    That’s my standard painting procedure at any rate.

    in reply to: Holy Roman Empire Army 28mm #198337
    Avatar photoTony S
    Participant

    They may not be Holy, nor Roman, nor an Empire but they certainly are well painted, well based and well flagged!  Nicely done!

    So, how many pots of metal armour paint did you go through? 😉

    in reply to: First Gaslands Team READY! #198163
    Avatar photoTony S
    Participant

    Honestly, I think the real attraction is the game is the sheer of fun of kit bashing and scratch building the vehicles.  It’s hard to stop once you’ve begun!

    To me, the game universe feels “forced” in some fashion, that it was very deliberately designed not to be the archetypal Mad Max wasteland, or a Car Wars style world.  Personally, it doesn’t hang together too well for my tastes, and I rather dislike the high tech weapons of one faction.  But that’s easy enough to ignore. 

    Great, great job on those cars!  They’ll ride into Valhalla, very shiny and chrome.

    Avatar photoTony S
    Participant

    I’ve heard nothing but good things about this game, but as a personal thing, I quite like painting figures but never have enjoyed making terrain.  (Perhaps because I’m awful at it, which just might be because I rarely ever actually make terrain.  A somewhat circular excuse to be sure).  And this game seems quite terrain heavy and figure light.

    That said, if I were offered a spot in someone else’s game, I’d be in there in a hot second!  That looked like a tremendous game, full of boys’ own heroics!  I admire a player who plays in the full spirit of the rules, and for fun, and manages to flout all probability.

    in reply to: Heavy brush stroke painting #198095
    Avatar photoTony S
    Participant

    If I remember correctly, years ago a friend got some 15mm figures from Essex Miniatures painting service, and they were in the same style as the ones shown by Andrew.  (I just checked, and judging from the current photos shown, Essex have either changed their style or perhaps painter).

    The figures, honestly, didn’t look too pretty up close, but as an army in the table, looked quite striking. However they certainly didn’t mix well with his other figures, that were painted by another painter who used white undercoat and staining techniques.  Personally, I rather liked the harsh style once we began playing.

    in reply to: Magister Militum closing up shop #197681
    Avatar photoTony S
    Participant

    Appreciate the update Andrew.  I was just looking for some Napoleonic figures yesterday, and lamenting the absence of Magister Militum.  Fingers crossed the 15s get bought by someone!

    Avatar photoTony S
    Participant

    Last year I played a miniatures tabletop game in 55 sessions, seven of which were solo affairs.  And played a single boardgame over a couple of evenings, so that’s what? A 96% miniature bias?

    Haven’t played RPGs since I was a teen, haven’t played computer games in a few years either.  I don’t mind boardgames, but honestly just enjoy everything else that surrounds tabletop gaming that boardgames don’t have – scenarios, painting, research.

    That said, the one boardgame I played was with a very good friend that just retired.  I keep telling myself that when I retire, I’ll definitely be playing more boardgames, although some of the contrarian replies here about that very thing worry me a trifle…

    in reply to: Free Game From Alternative Armies #197679
    Avatar photoTony S
    Participant

    I recently just took advantage of Alternative’s 20% sale to treat myself to the Ion Age Patrol Angis, and Furioso ECW.  I did eyeball the Flintloque rules, as they do seem to have a strong cult following.  I admit that I quite enjoy reading and trying different rulesets, and this one has piqued my interest for some time now.

    in reply to: Mortar smoke rounds? #197452
    Avatar photoTony S
    Participant

    According to the British manual of the time, the primary usage was usually smoke, but HE was of course also employed.

    https://stephentaylorhistorian.files.wordpress.com/2020/02/2inch-mortar-manual.pdf

    I found an interesting history of the US Army mortars.  Unfortunately no hard numbers of rounds, but apparently the larger 4.2 mortars were used by the Chemical Warfare units to deliver smoke.  It was noted in the Pacific that mortars were about the only fire support able to operate in jungle terrain, but the Chemical Units didn’t carry any HE.  Eventually by 1943, orders came down from on high, and they were tasked with fire support as well as smoke.

    https://apps.dtic.mil/sti/tr/pdf/AD0645160.pdf

     

    in reply to: The battle or campaign you always wanted to do? #197402
    Avatar photoTony S
    Participant

    WLU.  Wilfrid Laurier.  Early 80s.

    I wasn’t aware he taught in Montreal as well.

    in reply to: The battle or campaign you always wanted to do? #197369
    Avatar photoTony S
    Participant

    The Maple Leaf Route by Terry Copp and Robert Vogel (the latter being an excellent professor of mine at McGill University in the late 1970s and early 1980s).

    Ha!  Terry Copp was my history Prof!  Great, engaging speaker and writer.

    in reply to: Help Me Decide What To Paint This Weekend #197190
    Avatar photoTony S
    Participant

    Huh?  Are you even a human wargamer?  Are you suggesting that one can paint up forces for a game AND play it – all in one weekend!?

    I consider half painting a few dragoons over a weekend a victory.
    <p style=”text-align: left;”>Still, even though I now feel most inadequate, I’d plunk for Dieselpunk, rules unknown.</p>
    That said, I’ve been eyeing LI as well, but honestly wasn’t terribly impressed with the rules.  Didn’t seem to have much tactical depth, and far, far too many special weapon rules for me to get confused about.

    I was thinking of using the figures with Horizon Wars: Midnight Dark, or Future War Commander or Laserstorm, the latter of which you’ve already mentioned.  Seems like a wonderful dovetailing.

    in reply to: The battle or campaign you always wanted to do? #197071
    Avatar photoTony S
    Participant

    Forgive me for a minor initial thread hijack with reference to John’s potential “Palembang Ramrod” but if you’re not aware already of the new Fireball Forward air rules John, they are designed for large air actions, battles with 5-6 squadrons a side.  I cannot vouch for them, since I haven’t read them, but they do seem rather unique and interesting.</p>
    https://www.wargamevault.com/m/product/475095

    And as for Ivan’s original query – I’ve always been interested in the Burma theatre.  I know Peter Pig have a lovely 14th Army range, and hopefully someday I’ll actually have some, and painted so they I can use them!  To be honest, the impending Chain of Command Far East supplement may be just the ticket to get me moving on it.

    (Although I must admit there seem to be a few potential projects in front of that, already present in my lead mountain).

    in reply to: Monster Hunting in Egypt #196967
    Avatar photoTony S
    Participant

    I do believe the author already has a couple more cases on Wargame Vault.   I don’t have this particular set of rules by him, but I have a few others and they are quite interesting and fun to play.

    https://www.wargamevault.com/m/browser/publisher/14978

    I do like the beginnings of your campaign – er case Graham!  You seem to have a great knack for this era.

    Avatar photoTony S
    Participant

    I started as an historical miniature gamer (54mm Britain’s ACW and Airfix Napoleonics) as a kid, but would use Warhammer 2nd edition to play my brother in my teens because that’s all he liked to play.  Back then, you could stat out your own Warhammer armies, so human infantry + mail armour + large shield + short sword+ throwing javelin = Roman!  I only ever used historical forces, and of course no magic.  I ignored the fact that my brother used Orcs, and regarded them as barbarians, albeit with a greenish tint.

    Although I rather disliked SF and Fantasy miniature games at that time, I would play the occasional SF boardgame, like SPI Starsoldier or Starforce or Invasion America, or AH’s Starship Troopers.  I did read a lot of SF, with a tiny bit of fantasy here and there.

    Now, I’m almost exclusively a miniatures gamer, but still primarily a historical player.  I do play the occasional SF or Fantasy miniature game now, but of those few, the SF games are in the majority compared to fantasy games.

    Come to think of it – when Oathmark appeared a few years ago, we played a campaign of it, and I enjoyed it, but I just realized I did the same thing I did many years ago as a kid.  My nation was based on the Hyborean kingdom of Corinthia, so I could use my historical Greek Hoplite army!

    in reply to: Tank gun vs Anti-tank gun. Effectiveness? #196630
    Avatar photoTony S
    Participant

    Some of the difference might be due to training.  I seem to recall the number of kills in WW2 was much higher among the tank destroyer crews than the panzer crews, which was attributable to the fact that the tank destroyer gunners were from and trained by the artillery arm, and more specifically the anti tank guns, whereas the tank gunners were trained by the panzer korps.

    I remember reading about the tank destroyer gun sights were rather cleverly designed to be both fast in acquiring the target and range, while rather simple to use.  The autobiography “Panzer Gunner” describes it rather well, with illustrations.  Apparently the equivalent sights in a PzIV for example, were not as good.

    Reports also stated that the regular tanks, like the Panzer IV, were not at ease in this kind of offensive due to their preference for mobility. With less refined optics, a high silhouette and poor cooperation with infantry, they were found less efficient in every way. So much so that it was reported from an anonymous tank commander “I would rather have one StuG Abteilung rather than an entire Panzerdivision”.

    https://tanks-encyclopedia.com/ww2/nazi_germany/stugiiig/#index16

    (As an aside, I was a little startled when I began reading his memories of his hometown – the author grew up about a block away from me and went to the school I see out my front window)!

    Avatar photoTony S
    Participant

    Very intriguing, especially as a copy of the new Helion book “Khalsa” is even now winging its way to me.  A friend at the club is quite interested in the Sikh Wars, but we’re not entirely sure about which rules to use.

    I’m guessing that you used GdA as written, without any modifications for this conflict?  I did see that you dispensed with skirmishers.  How did you rate the various troops?

    As you say though, very nice to see a more obscure war on the table.

    in reply to: Leipzig Refight 28mm Deployment #196481
    Avatar photoTony S
    Participant

    Leipzig?  28mm?  A stupendous looking project!  Although, if the Prussian player hasn’t finished yet yet, perhaps you should play Waterloo instead to give him a few more hours…

    Avatar photoTony S
    Participant

    Yes, I agree with everyone else.  Totally fascinating, and I certainly appreciate all the extra effort you put into posting the story.

    in reply to: Limiting Command/HQ Intel #196341
    Avatar photoTony S
    Participant

    I’d have to agree with your assessment of some games, like as you mention Chain of Command or O Group.  (Just for the record, I have a huge bias for such games that do incorporate such command friction or fog of war).  I think such game designers are seeking to limit a player’s own foreknowledge of possibilities – in CoC, players have no idea what exactly they can activate next turn, although they do have some leeway, and therefore some decisions must be made.

    But as you say, that knowledge of the roll is public, and perhaps would give you an idea of what your opponent is thinking.  Especially if his roll is particularly dreadful; what they prioritise as their most important activation might provide some insight as to his true plan.  You’re a more astute or cunning player than myself I think!  I’d just try and take advantage of his poor roll, hopefully a tactical opening would appear that I could exploit.  Just for the record, our houserule when playing Chain of Command, or any rules that allow off table reserves, is that we keep those figures hidden in the boxes and completely unknown to the enemy and only bring them out when they are released onto the table.  It’s especially fun with Chain of Command, and tends to encourage players to deliberately withhold reserves just to keep our opponents worried and in the dark.

    That said, you may consider trying rules that have players use a hand of cards to control their actions.  I’m thinking primarily of Longstreet or Maurice, by Sam Mustafa.  Since you have no idea of what options they are holding, sometimes you can be rudely surprised.  My usual opponent is particularly good at patiently holding certain cards to plan a devastating attack.  Come to think of it, there’s a card (Confederate Sympathisers if memory serves) that allows a rebel player to examine the enemy’s hand.  That would indeed give the southern player a definite insight into what the Union is planning.

    in reply to: Wars of Eagles and Empires #196292
    Avatar photoTony S
    Participant

    One thing the world probably doesn’t need is yet another set of wargaming rules for the Napoleonic Wars

    No, absolutely not.  Totally ridiculous to even consider such a thing.  Madness.

    but that didn’t stop me from writing (another) one.

    Oooh!  Where’s my credit card?

    I’m not sure why, but I seem to always – or nearly so – pick up Napoleonic rulesets.  Right now, on my coffee table, I see Glory Is Fleeting, General d’Armee 2, LaSalle 2 and Soldiers of Napoleon.  I find them fascinating to read, and as I am lucky enough to have another poor soul with my affliction (surely it’s recognized in the DSM-5 by now?) I usually also play them.  With the exception of GdA2, I’ve played them multiple times, and heartily endorse them.

    Your set sound quite interesting.  I’m sure it will end up on my bookshelf (even as a PDF; I always print them out to play).

    Does it cover the Revolutionary Wars as well ?  Lately that’s been my windmill I’m tilting at.  There aren’t many rules out there that cover that decently.  Mind you, how does one replicate that period of warfare when there are so many competing theories about what that period is warfare actually entails?

     

    in reply to: Giving GdA2 a run #196229
    Avatar photoTony S
    Participant

    Looked like a great game with some nice figures and terrain.

    Had a read through of GdA2 last night actually, and was thinking that this is exactly the sort of game that I’ll forget many rules at crucial times.  But that what rematches are for!

    Did you find it played faster than GdA?  The combat rules seemed a little cleaner, but I’m just going from memory and haven’t really compared the old rules to the new.  I do know I enjoyed the first edition and am looking forward to trying the new set out soon.

    Avatar photoTony S
    Participant

    What an excellent idea!  Tremendous looking game.  I’ve really enjoyed the games of O Group I’ve tried, and setting in an alternative 1946 war seems quite intriguing.  Especially with Gale Force Mine coming out with those new hypothetical models for that era.

    One hopes Mr Brown had the foresight and good taste to include data for the Maus and the Tortoise.  😉

    Avatar photoTony S
    Participant

    Very tempting stuff!  In fact, your designs are so tempting that the thought of actually buying a 3D printer, because I don’t own one, is flitting across my brain.
    <p style=”text-align: left;”>Obviously not owning one, I know very little about them, but how well do your models scale down to 15mm?  Also, do the printers need a computer?  I mean, obviously a computer is needed to download the files, and perhaps rip them (?) but do the printers need to be plugged into the printers while they are printing, or can a USB or WiFi be used to send or transfer the files?  That is – do I need to have the printer beside the computer in the den, or can I bury the printer deep into the basement and let it run on its own?  I assume Blender would be a good choice for software?</p>
    My apologies for my no doubt breathtaking ignorance!

    Avatar photoTony S
    Participant

    Tremendous looking game!  I like the idea of using blinds to represent enemy troops – or dummies – because of the misty day.

     

    in reply to: Gridded Horse & Musket Rules Recommendations #195752
    Avatar photoTony S
    Participant

    I’d suggest Portable Wargames, by Bob Cordery.

    https://www.amazon.ca/s?k=portable+wargame+cordery&crid=1YNJ4HA3P7W8R&sprefix=portable+wargame+cordery%2Caps%2C312&ref=nb_sb_noss

    It’s somewhat akin to One Hour Wargames in that they are quite simple, and therefore very easy to modify or build upon, but are grid based.  If memory serves, Bob originally used a chess board to develop them.  Larger squares are of course possible.

    There are a number of period variants available, together with a simple solo modification (that I suggest should be used with two player games as well).

    They’re also available through Wargames Vault if you want a cheaper flutter at them.  I’ve got most of the various rules.  There are some clever ideas in there, even if the writing style is less enjoyable than OHW.  But for my tastes, the game itself is more interesting and better than OHW.

    (Except for the OHW scenarios – they are a fantastic resource that can be used for many different rules including the Portable ones!)

    in reply to: Terrain for Fantasy and Post Apocalyptic #195528
    Avatar photoTony S
    Participant

    Those mirrors do look particularly cool.  Or creepy.  Or both.

    Avatar photoTony S
    Participant

    They look very nice!  How many pots of metallic paint did you use up?  😉

    Although I have mixed feelings about Saga for historical games, oddly enough, I rather enjoyed the few times I cobbled together a force for Fantasy Saga.  Hopefully you get to use your new figures for a game soon!

    in reply to: A French contingent for the Crimean War 15mm #194713
    Avatar photoTony S
    Participant

    Very nice!  Sometimes the older, smooth style of classic Minifigs is just fun to paint.  I’m sure Sevastopol will surrender immediately once they spy those fine fellows advancing!

Viewing 40 posts - 1 through 40 (of 928 total)