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  • in reply to: Holy Smoke! #147153
    zippyfusenet
    Participant

    What an excellent model of a fascinating and significant archaeological site. Bravo.

    If I may…you might include in the scene some families come from the countryside with livestock to make a sacrifice, and some other families camped, making a feast from the sacrificed animal.

    You'll shoot your eye out, kid!

    in reply to: Portuguese Flag #146129
    zippyfusenet
    Participant

    one of the links appears to indicate red cloth backing rather than white.

    The red field was the royal standard. I’m not entirely sure of the protocol, but I believe it would be flown on the palace when the king was in residence, flown on the royal yacht went the king went water-skiing, etc.

    You'll shoot your eye out, kid!

    in reply to: Portuguese Flag #146118
    zippyfusenet
    Participant

    Well said, Jemima!

    You'll shoot your eye out, kid!

    in reply to: Portuguese Flag #146094
    zippyfusenet
    Participant

    In the 18th and early 19th centuries, national flags were flown on ships, fortresses and other public buildings. I believe the Portuguese national flag of this era was the white flag with the crowned national coat of arms, as shown on the historical flag page I linked earlier.

    You'll shoot your eye out, kid!

    in reply to: Portuguese Flag #146056
    zippyfusenet
    Participant

    Portuguese infantry in the Napoleonic Wars did not carry a ‘national flag’. They carried a King’s Color and a Regimental Color. The King’s Color was the multi-colored design shown on the left in this picture. It was the same for all regiments. The Regimental Color had a solid colored field, and is shown on the right in this picture. The field of the Regimental Color was the same as that regiment’s facing color. (Hmm, actually not in this picture. That’s not what I expected to see.) These flags are shown in more detail on the Warflags site that I linked earlier.

    You'll shoot your eye out, kid!

    in reply to: Portuguese Flag #145989
    zippyfusenet
    Participant

    Ian Croxall’s Warflag site has these designs:

    http://www.warflag.com/flags/napoleon/napportt.shtml

    I believe the regimental color matched the regiment’s facings.

    Here’s a good site on historical flags, although it doesn’t cover military standards:

    https://www.fotw.info/flags/pt_1706.html

     

    You'll shoot your eye out, kid!

    in reply to: CY6! Thunder Gods Shake Heaven #145975
    zippyfusenet
    Participant

    Thanx. The models are mostly pre-paints, F-Toys and 21st Century Hayates and New-Ray/Testors B-29s. Japanese robots painted them, I can only  take credit for collecting and staging them in a game.

    I built just one of those toy airplanes, Dauntless Dotty, the B-29 in the middle of  the formation that’s less shiny than the others. She’s the old Revell Picture Box Kit B-29. She illustrates the trajectory of my life  in the hobby.

    I first built that kit in the early 1960s, when it was new and so was I. Some time in the 90s, Revell sold off the molds. I found a copy on a store shelf that carried the Academy label. I suppose some other Chinese toy company has the molds now. Thinking I recognized it, I brought it home, ripped off the shrink-wrap and confirmed it was the classic old kit. The engineering was okay for the era, and  the molds were still in pretty good shape. I glued Dotty together in a few hours snatched from my middle-aged life, slapped on some paint, then I got frustrated when some masking failed me, and put the part-built project away in a box on a shelf.

    Twenty-odd years later…after retirement…digging  through boxes…I opened that one, and determined to finish the model, now that I had the time and patience to fix my mistakes. I still had the decals, and they didn’t disintegrate when I dipped them in water. Success! Completion! Game time!

    So what Dotty illustrates is: my continual magpie distraction from one project to another, my hoarding tendencies, and the fact that once in a great while, I complete something and play with it. That’s life as I know it.

    I have fun.

    You'll shoot your eye out, kid!

    in reply to: CY6! Thunder Gods Shake Heaven #145668
    zippyfusenet
    Participant

    Good to hear from you, Dave. It’s been a while. I hope you and your family are well.

    Thunder Gods is a fun scenario. The giant bombers get attention. They’re Robustness 4, so it’s a lot of work to shoot them down. I’ve run this game once each for both of my local game clubs. I hope to take it on the road once we start having game cons again.

    You'll shoot your eye out, kid!

    in reply to: What are you reading? #143627
    zippyfusenet
    Participant

    …the first volume of Khrushchev Remembers.


    I have never read this but it sounds fascinating. I will add it to my wish list.

    I recommend having a firm grasp of Stalin-era events and personalities before tackling Khrushschev Remembers. The book is not a purposeful memoir, but rather edited notes from a series of long conversations with Khrushschev in his retirement. The old man rambles around and leaves a great deal out.

    I have recently read Timothy Snyder’s Bloodlands for a modern view of  the collectivization famines and the terror, and Robert Conquest’s Stalin, Breaker of Nations for a biography of  the monster himself.

     

    You'll shoot your eye out, kid!

    in reply to: What are you reading? #143597
    zippyfusenet
    Participant

    …the first volume of Khrushchev Remembers.

    I read that back in the 1970s when it was new, then re-read it a few months ago. Seeing the movie The Death of Stalin set me to re-reading my shelf of books on Stalin and his minions. When KR was first published there were doubts about its authenticity, but I think it’s the real thing, based only on my own intuition. On the second reading, it’s a fascinating and terrible confession of a life of cognitive dissonance. Khrushchev participated enthusiastically in some of the greatest crimes against humanity, later denounced those crimes without taking personal responsibility, and apparently remained an idealistic and believing Communist through it all and until the end. What terrible things humans are capable of.

    I apologize if that was political. Sometimes the mouth must speak the words that are in the heart.

    You'll shoot your eye out, kid!

    in reply to: What are you reading? #143590
    zippyfusenet
    Participant

    The Polish Air Force At War: The Official History Vol.1 1939-1943

    Kangaroo Squadron: American Courage in the Darkest Days of World War II

    The Arabian Nights

     

    You'll shoot your eye out, kid!

    in reply to: Alternatives to Bag the Hun #143401
    zippyfusenet
    Participant

    Red Sun/Blue Sky covers Pacific and East Asia 1941-42. Besides the base rules and the aircraft data, I’d say that the best part is the scenario section, that includes all the main carrier battles.

    If you have trouble finding the RS/BS book, email me: zippy-at-fuse-dot-net. I have a spreadsheet that consolidates aircraft data from the first four published Blue Skies books, including RS/BS, along with some fan-developed stats from the old Blue Skies Yahoo group. I’d be happy to share it. You could use the spreadsheet data along with the Luftwaffe 1946 rule book to stage games.

    You'll shoot your eye out, kid!

    in reply to: Alternatives to Bag the Hun #143378
    zippyfusenet
    Participant

    MSD Games carries the whole Blue Skies and Luft 46 series, except for Squadrons and Black Cross/Blue Sky, which are both OOP. I’m sure MSD will happily ship to the UK. No, I’m not a shareholder, just a fanboy:

    http://msdgames.com/epages/bccb46a7-1a07-48ac-8a77-e8e6cce9e958.sf/en_US/?ObjectPath=/Shops/bccb46a7-1a07-48ac-8a77-e8e6cce9e958/Categories/%22LUFTWAFFE%201946%22/%22LUFTWAFFE%201946%7CRules%20and%20Supplements%22

    In the UK, Caliver Books has Black Cross/Blue Sky (only 2 copies left!) and Lost Squadrons. I couldn’t find any other Blue Skies or Luft 46 rules in the Caliver catalog, but they’ve carried them in the past, so you might want to email and check:

    https://www.caliverbooks.com/searchcat.php?words=blue+sky&price=&period=

    You will note that the prices on BC/BS and LS are mighty stiff. That’s because these are boxed sets, and there’s a lot in the box besides rule books. If you want to know more, ask and I’ll drone on about it.

    One thing to beware is that the base rules for Blue Skies are not in every volume of the series. You can find base rules in Squadrons (a prototype rule set, but they work, if you can find a copy), Red Sun/Blue Sky (a more developed set, note that there are additional rules, but not the base rules, in other Blue Skies volumes), Black Cross/Blue Sky (a consolidated rule book, including the base rules from RS/BS and all additions), Luftwaffe 1946 (complete rules, slightly re-engineered), and Kamikaze 1946 (same rules as L46). Any of the rule versions work with any set of airplane statistics, though some players prefer a particular version. But you need to have at least one in order to play.

    You'll shoot your eye out, kid!

    in reply to: Alternatives to Bag the Hun #142382
    zippyfusenet
    Participant

    I think the one I haven’t got is the Battle of Britain one but I could extract the aircraft stats from the other books then use the CY6 scenario books for games.

    I happen to have a spreadsheet of Blue Skies BoB aircraft stats. It came from Marty Fenelon’s MSD Games website. Here’s a link. Or if you don’t want to bother setting up an MSD Games account to get the free downloads, email me and I’ll send you a copy.  zippy-at-fuse-dot-net is my email.

    http://msdgames.com/epages/bccb46a7-1a07-48ac-8a77-e8e6cce9e958.sf/en_US/?ObjectPath=/Shops/bccb46a7-1a07-48ac-8a77-e8e6cce9e958/Products/D-0023

     

    I just found this different spreadsheet on the MSD Games site that may be more complete. I haven’t downloaded this one yet, so I’m guessing:

    http://msdgames.com/epages/bccb46a7-1a07-48ac-8a77-e8e6cce9e958.sf/en_US/?ObjectPath=/Shops/bccb46a7-1a07-48ac-8a77-e8e6cce9e958/Products/D-0026

     

    You'll shoot your eye out, kid!

    in reply to: Alternatives to Bag the Hun #142341
    zippyfusenet
    Participant

    I didn’t initially bring  up Luftwaffe 1946 because it fails your spec “a non-hex based system”. Since you’re interested after all, I’ll add a few thoughts.

    Luftwaffe 1946 is a descendant of John Stanoch’s Blue Skies series of miniatures rules, that started with the Squadrons Battle of Britain rules in 1994.

    https://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/14144/squadrons-air-combat-rules-1300th-scale-planes

    The game engine supports play by a few players with a large number of 1/285 airplane models: squadrons and sometimes groups. The biggest game I’ve played is the Midway ‘Death of Kido Butai’ scenario from Red Sun/Blue Sky, with 60 aircraft models in the game, besides half a dozen ship models. Most scenarios are smaller than that. No rules enforce formation flying, but it’s usually smart to keep your planes together for mutual support.

    Each book in the Blue Skies series and its cousins covers a year or two in a specific theater. Luftwaffe 1946 features mostly German, British and US aircraft from 1944-46, including some German types that were never built, and some Allied prototype and post-war designs. Kamikaze 1946 similarly covers 1944-46 in the Pacific. If you’re looking for Blitzkrieg Era, or Barbarossa or other campaigns, those planes and their statistics are in other books of the series. There are also some spreadsheets floating around that consolidate and reconcile airplane stats from different books, but beware that the stats are not entirely consistent across the books. The planes are rated for each book in relation to one another, so the stats for a Spitfire V, for example, can be different from one theater to another. Marty Fenelon has tried to reconcile all the statistics for his 1946 series rules. Post if you’re interested in a particular campaign, and I’ll try to identify the book you want.

    You'll shoot your eye out, kid!

    in reply to: My 20mm ACW forces #137115
    zippyfusenet
    Participant

    Thanks for the close-up fairoaks. I enjoy getting a good look at them.

    It appears you’re building one  eight-figure base per regiment. That’s a good system. You can get something done that way.

    You'll shoot your eye out, kid!

    in reply to: I need advice on a vice #136912
    zippyfusenet
    Participant

    I agree with others’ advice.

    Note also that brass rod is much easier to cut and work than steel wire. I’ve notched my wire snips trying to cut the wrong stuff.

    “The Minifigs I am hoping to repair are old 2nd gen figures and their hands are quite small. Has anyone successfully managed to drill out the hands on figures like these or would I be better off filing a groove into one side of the hand and gluing the pike in place.”

    I repair a lot of small figures. I work with obsessive care, but I often destroy a hand in the process of drilling it out. I attach the replacement bit with a blob of  two-part epoxy to whatever fragment or stump is left. In 15mm scale, no one notices the damage under a coat of paint.

    You'll shoot your eye out, kid!

    in reply to: My 20mm ACW forces #136784
    zippyfusenet
    Participant

    I’ve always liked 20mm plastic. I used to pedal my bicycle to the hobby shop at the mall and plunk down a quarter for a box of Airfix HO/OO figures. The product today is much better. With ACW collections in 15mm and 28mm, I won’t start up again with 1/72 plastic, but I’d enjoy looking at yours.

    These old eyes could see better if your photos were a bit bigger…

    You'll shoot your eye out, kid!

    in reply to: Corn… more properly, Maize… #136641
    zippyfusenet
    Participant

    Btw, do you know of anyone selling Aztec temples (large)?

    You might find something useful in the Acheson Creations 25mm Meso-American range:

    https://achesoncreations.com/index.php/storefront/meso-america/25mm-meso-america

     

    You'll shoot your eye out, kid!

    in reply to: Minifigs S range.. #136411
    zippyfusenet
    Participant

    The Minifigs S range are small, ‘one inch’ 25mm figures. Some modern 1/72 figures approach 23 or 24mm, but metal figures are usually bulkier than plastic. It’s a matter of taste, but I wouldn’t mix S range figs with 20mm, the difference would be visible.

     

     

    You'll shoot your eye out, kid!

    in reply to: Corn… more properly, Maize… #135931
    zippyfusenet
    Participant

    I like it.

    You'll shoot your eye out, kid!

    zippyfusenet
    Participant

    Great work on one of my favorite armies. I like the detail on those tiny little Chariot Miniatures faces. And the lightning bolt is a stab of genius. I’m a fan of Chariot minis, though I find them to sometimes be weak in the ankles. I often reinforce their ankles with a dab of epoxy.

    You'll shoot your eye out, kid!

    in reply to: Bombing Height #134945
    zippyfusenet
    Participant

    I suppose you’re thinking of WWII. It seems to me that practice varied for different air forces at different times in different theaters.

    In New Guinea in 1943, US A-20s and B-25s raided Japanese airbases at tree-top altitude to avoid flak, coming in so low that they developed a new type of munition, the ‘para-frag bomb’, a fragmentation bomb on a parachute, so that the raider could get clear of the target before the bomb load went off.

    On the other hand, I was just reading Danny Parker To Win The Winter Sky, a detailed account of the tactical airwar in northwest Europe 1944-5, with special focus on the Battle of the Bulge. Without pulling the book to refresh my memory…Parker recounts that one of the senior commanders in US 9th Air Force had the fixed idea that his medium bombers should operate like fighter bombers, coming in low and fast to hit their targets with pinpoint accuracy. A couple of times he sent medium bombardment groups on low-level missions, and they were shot to pieces by German light flak. After that, the mediums bombed from altitudes above the German light flak.

    I don’t know why the low-and-fast tactic worked against the Japanese in New Guinea but failed against the Germans in 1944.

    I expect to get an accurate picture of medium bomber tactics, you’ll need to read up on the particular campaign that interests you.

    You'll shoot your eye out, kid!

    in reply to: More Biblical Buildings (and People) #134395
    zippyfusenet
    Participant

    Very impressive modeling. Do you play games with them?

    You'll shoot your eye out, kid!

    in reply to: Military sci-fi book suggestions? #133738
    zippyfusenet
    Participant

    If you like Larry Niven, you might want to try the Man-Kzin Wars series. It’s not Niven, Niven franchised his war to whomever might want to try it out, and a great many authors have written their takes on various episodes. It’s not a novel nor a series of novels, but it’s multi-volume; some of the contributions are novella length, and there’s a unifying theme. I dug it:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Man-Kzin_Wars

     

    You'll shoot your eye out, kid!

    in reply to: 18th c. Northeast Native American Longhouses… #132859
    zippyfusenet
    Participant

    Those came out great. The weathering on the roofs is something many models are missing. (I should touch mine up. Henh.) Nice set of villagers, too.

    You'll shoot your eye out, kid!

    in reply to: 18th c. Northeast Native American Longhouses… #132512
    zippyfusenet
    Participant

    I’m glad you’re enjoying the pix. I worried that I’d hijacked your thread. Since you encourage me, I’ll carry on. I’m no expert of course, but I’ll share what I have.

    There’s no signage at Kispoko, so sometimes we have to guess. I don’t think this is a beehive – honey bees aren’t native to North America, they were brought over from Europe. My best guess is that this is a smoker. Someone built a small fire in the bottom of the structure, and the top part looks smokey on the inside. Maybe it was an experiment, the top part couldn’t hold more than a few pounds of meat.

    Justin Houston told me that the thatch-roofed building with vertical log walls is Cherokee traditional architecture. It looks different than the buildings I saw at Oconaluftee Indian Village in Cherokee North Carolina. I’ll take Justin’s word, I’m not familiar.

    Here’s an open-front booth that seems too open to live in. I expect it’s to sit in and do craft work in good weather. That’s what  people were doing in structures like this at Oconaluftee. I think open-sided arbors, roofed with leafy branches for shade were also common village structures, probably every household had one or two:

    I know that the Creek Indians farther south built above-ground granaries, but I don’t know about any north of the Ohio River or in the Great Lakes/St. Lawrence region. I’ve read that people in the Ohio country often stored corn in underground pits. People in the Ohio country usually left their villages after the fall harvest, to go on the winter hunt in family groups, so it was wise to secure the corn in a pit under a big rock.

    In Osage Indian Customs and Myths, Louis F. Burns wrote something I’ve long suspected: that Indians usually gathered deadfall for firewood, and rarely cut or chopped wood. Burns wrote specifically about the Osage, but I have noted many accounts of Indian women and children gathering wood, and none of wood-cutting, so I think the practice was general. In this well-known Karl Bodmer painting Sioux Camp, there’s a low pile of brushwood in  front of the rightmost tipi, and I think that’s the woodpile:

    I made a couple of Indian woodpiles, out of scraps of grape stem. You could use any twigs you have handy. Grape stem is lovely, organic, woody, fractal-looking stuff. It’s not very robust, but if some pieces break off, no problem, I eat another bag of grapes and glue on some more stem. Behind the woodpiles is a section of abatis that I’ve built from grape stem.

    Here’s some other bric-a-brac I use to decorate Indian camps and villages. The stretched hides and cooking gear are all from the 1/72 Imex Eastern Friendly Indian, Lewis and Clark and Pioneer sets. They’re theoretically a bit small for 28mm models, but really, they look fine. Besides the camp items, I pillage the Imex sets for figures I can use in my 28mm collection as teenagers and children. Also, a couple of  the sets have plastic tipis and wigwams that are too small for their nominal 1/72 scale, but great for 15mm:

    Here are a few more pix from Kispoko. It’s an experimental archaeology project, and probably not all the experiments succeed. Here’s a stretch of wicker fence that someone experimented with. It doesn’t seem to fence anything in particular. I don’t know why anything in an Indian village would be fenced:

    This structure with wicker walls and bark roof looks like a pen for animals, maybe a chicken coop. Pre-contact Indians kept no domestic animals besides dogs, but some native people learned to keep livestock:

    Someone carved this turtle into a tree at Kispoko. Woodwork sculpture is a deep tradition in the woodlands. Might be hard to represent in 28mm, though:

    That’s all I have for now. Best regards.

    You'll shoot your eye out, kid!

    in reply to: 18th c. Northeast Native American Longhouses… #132501
    zippyfusenet
    Participant

    Perhaps the first re-enactment event I ever attended was the ‘Siege of Fort Liberty’ held there 1980-ish. I’ve not been back since.

    Small world, hainna? You should come for The Fair At New Boston this year, it’s grown into quite a show:

    https://www.fairatnewboston.org/

    Kispoko Village is worth visiting in any season. It’s an experimental archaeology project where many types of Native American lodges have been built. Here’s an interior shot of the longhouse:

    Here’s a late 18th century style Shawnee cabin:

    A wigwam:

    Kispoko is livelier during the Fair:

    And you’ll have a chance to talk with Justin Houston, the architect and project lead of Kispoko. He’s a gentleman, a scholar and a showman:

    You'll shoot your eye out, kid!

    in reply to: 18th c. Northeast Native American Longhouses… #132471
    zippyfusenet
    Participant

    Looking good. Here’s a live one that stands in Kispoko Village, in George Rogers Clark Park outside Springfield, Ohio.

    You'll shoot your eye out, kid!

    in reply to: On the virtues of IGO-UGO #130870
    zippyfusenet
    Participant

    Strongly agree, Chris. The more players in a game, the more I want as many players as possible to play at the same time, instead of each waiting for his personal sub-turn.

    IGO-UGO rules let half the players be active at once, *if* everyone knows the rules well enough to play without constant adjudication. So I like IGO-UGO rules for multi-player games, and I also prefer that rules be simple, clearly defined and if possible, known to all.

    In my experience, rules designed around simultaneous written orders are the very best for keeping all players active at once. Everyone writes, then everyone executes, then everyone shoots. In order to keep the game playable, it’s best if the order assignment procedure is restricted to a limited set of order chits or codes, and if movement is defined on a hex grid. I mostly play this style of game with toy airplanes. It can also work with toy ships. In air and sea games the units are sharply defined as a small number of airplanes or vessels. I haven’t seen si-move done really well for land games since Quebec 1759, and that was a one-on-one boardgame. I like Johnny Reb for the si-move, but I have friends who hate it.

    I think about these issues a lot, because most of my wargaming these days is done at clubs and conventions. I enjoy the social interaction, but the multi-player requirement restricts the rules that fit the environment. I’m getting an itch to set up a personal wargaming space, so I can host friends for one-on-one games, and enjoy some of the innovative rule sets that work best head-to-head.

     

    You'll shoot your eye out, kid!

    zippyfusenet
    Participant

    Painting, “Luftwaffe”, Bronislaw Linke:

     

    You'll shoot your eye out, kid!

    in reply to: 1917… #130416
    zippyfusenet
    Participant

    I saw 1917 when it opened. It didn’t occur to me to compare 1917 with Dunkirk, though they did both have a certain claustrophobic aspect of, er, hanging on in quiet desperation. But they’re two very different movies, one very much The Legend Of Dunkirk, and 1917 a tale of a heroic quest through Hell, based on stories Sam Mendes heard from his Grandfather.

    I was struck by the moderated gruesomeness of 1917. On the one hand, no man’s land was full of rotting corpses and rats, and men hunting and killing men right, left and center without pause or mercy. On the other hand, there wasn’t much splatter or screaming or thrashing around. Men got hit and went down, a shell hit and men went down.

    On the other hand. It occurred to me that the front must have reeked. I guess it’s a good thing that you couldn’t smell the movie in the theater. It would have killed the popcorn sales.

    You'll shoot your eye out, kid!

    in reply to: Playing an impossible game #130272
    zippyfusenet
    Participant

    The most balanced games that I’ve played have been run at conventions, and I have to say they have provided a disproportionately high number of sleepers. Games that lacked drama or notable events. There was no or little adventure to the experience.

    This. I play wargames for entertainment. I see miniature wargaming as a form of theater. Famous Last Stands like The Three Hundred, The Alamo, Little Big Horn or Isandlwana are always popular with wargamers because they offer spectacle, drama and emotional engagement. Even better if the GM arranges the game so that the disadvantaged side can ‘win on points’ by good play. A puppy getting run over by a truck lacks drama, so is not an engaging scenario.

    You'll shoot your eye out, kid!

    in reply to: Sprues or Miniatures? #130269
    zippyfusenet
    Participant

    You’re not the only one Phil. I’ve avoided buying boxes of plastic 28mm figures, even though they look good built up and they’re easy to customize, because I don’t need the PITA of putting them together. I still build armies, and I hate to spend time assembling each figure before I can start painting.

    It’s not just plastic; multi-part metal figures are even more of a time sink, what with drilling and pinning and puttying and sanding the parts that never join quite right. I’m still working on five bags of Old Glory multi-part Plains Indians that I bought…must have been 15 years ago. Vey iz mir.

    You'll shoot your eye out, kid!

    in reply to: 6mm WWII aircraft gallery. #129957
    zippyfusenet
    Participant

    Your posts are always inspiring, Dave. Thanks for putting on another show.

    You'll shoot your eye out, kid!

    in reply to: Bandwagon? #129502
    zippyfusenet
    Participant

    “Have you played with all the toys you already have?”

    “No Ma, I haven’t.”

    “Then why do you need to buy more toys?”

    There’s enough stuff already in my basement to keep me amused for several lifetimes. When I play with my friends, I supply all rules, terrain and troops for the game, or one of them does. It’s unusual for more than one of us to contribute to any project.

    So no, I hardly ever buy a new release, unless it’s right in the sweet spot of one of my existing interests. Um, like Flint & Feather was, or the new 303 Squadron Kickstarter. (“I’m GONNA play with that, Ma. Really, I’m GONNA. Soon.”)

    You'll shoot your eye out, kid!

    in reply to: Ebay still a thing? #129010
    zippyfusenet
    Participant

    What Geof said. Once in a while I’ll buy something from a professional Ebay vendor, but I haven’t tried to sell anything there in years. Too much trouble, too few sales, and any benefit is mainly skimmed off by them. I prefer TWW and other free classified sites, although, truth be told, I rarely put up ads. I’m more likely to haul my cast-offs to a convention flea market, if I can get a free table.

    The Wargame Miniatures Marketplace on Facebook is a happening place, these days:

    https://www.facebook.com/groups/1346860018660392/

     

    You'll shoot your eye out, kid!

    in reply to: Genuine, but very un-pc, question… #128918
    zippyfusenet
    Participant

    I’ve recently upgraded my desktop publishing skills and I’ve been able to produce several passable custom card decks for Wings of Glory.

    Besides your computer, you’ll need a scanner and an inkjet printer, garden variety graphics software like Paint and Word, and sundry office and craft supplies that can be found in the big-box stores or ordered online. You’ll need a custom design for the backs of the cards.

    It’s a non-trivial amount of crafty work, and I’d rather buy my cards tailor-made. If you can’t find a suitable card deck, you might consider making one yourself.

    You'll shoot your eye out, kid!

    in reply to: What's your favourite ancients ruleset and why? #128764
    zippyfusenet
    Participant

    About a year ago I was introduced to Mark Lewis’ Sword & Spear rules, published by Great Escape games. I started GMing S&S games this past spring, and I like ’em.

    http://www.greatescapegames.co.uk/sword-spear

    I like ’em because they play well in a club environment with up to 8 or 10 players in a game, keep everyone involved and entertained, and give a clear win-or-lose result in three hours of play on a club game night.

    The S&S rules are well written and understandable, explained with many examples of play. S&S covers all ancient and medieval periods, so may be too generic for specialists, but I think there’s enough chrome applied to the different troop types and army lists to distinguish Bronze Age from Early Iron or Classical. F’rinstance, chariots are not just cavalry with wheels, there are archery chariots vs spear chariots, tribal militia archers are different from regulars and so on. S&S are big-battle rules for big armies, they are not suitable for small skirmishes or pre-state warfare, and will require armies of c. 50 to 80 stands of figures per side. They are scale and mounting-agnostic, and can be played using any size figures mounted to any consistent system, although playing with bigger troop stands increases movement distances and shooting ranges, so requires a bigger playing area.

    As written, S&S is designed for one-on-one games, with a nod to multi-player. I hack the rules a bit for club play, by organizing my armies into multiple divisions, each with its own player-commander, and giving each commander his own set of activation/command dice which apply only to his own command.

    This is the first rule set in years that’s motivated me to bring out my large collection of WRG-mounted 15mm Bronze and Early Iron age armies and play with them. Here are a few snaps from the first scenario I ginned up, that I ran for two different local clubs, and they asked for more. It’s The Battle of Wawat, a pitched battle between a Memphite Egyptian army (just before early New Kingdom) and a Napatan Kushite army, to raise the Kushite siege of an Egyptian fortified town in disputed territory:

     

    The upcoming game will be The Battle of Mt. Gilboa – The Deaths of Saul and Jonathan. Philistines vs. Israelites for all the marbles.

     

     

    You'll shoot your eye out, kid!

    in reply to: Inexpensive flexible roads… #128434
    zippyfusenet
    Participant

    Looks great. Thanks for sharing your brainstorm and the result.

    You'll shoot your eye out, kid!

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