Home Forums Horse and Musket 18th Century Catastrophe on the Penobscot, 1779

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  • #173051
    vtsaogames
    Participant

    A tale of a doomed expedition can be found here.

    Or, what can happen when George Washington and/or John Paul Jones are not on hand.

    It's never too late to have a happy childhood

    #173055
    Darkest Star Games
    Participant

    I can’t help but think of MASH every time I read or hear “Penobscot”.

    What little I have read about warfare in that era has left me a bit surprised at how often the advantage was lost due to higher/general officers just arguing or doing nothing (or, like, going to the opera and stuff for enjoyment rather than war stuff) for extended periods of time.  Seems pretty preposterous now but I am sure back then the relationships between officers and nobles, etc, were much more complicated than just “this guy is higher on the food chain”.

    …though I am not surprised at all about financial or political gain being linked to action.

    "I saw this in a cartoon once, but I'm pretty sure I can do it..."

    #173062
    vtsaogames
    Participant

    Friction between generals isn’t restricted to the black powder period.

    MacArthur on Eisenhower: “Best clerk I ever had”.

    Eisenhower on MacArthur: “I studied drama under him for eight years”.

     

    I hear tell Stormin’ Norman was nicknamed that due to his volcanic temper, rather than conbat preformance.

     

    Naval/army friction has been the cause of most failed amphibious ventures, like Cartagena during the War of Jenkin’s Ear, or the Ottoman descent on Malta.

     

    Of note is how well Grant got along with his Navy counterparts on his collaborations with the Navy both along western rivers and the James River in Virginia.

    It's never too late to have a happy childhood

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